cordage


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cord·age

 (kôr′dĭj)
n.
1. Cords or ropes, especially the ropes in the rigging of a ship.
2. The amount of wood in an area as measured in cords.

cordage

(ˈkɔːdɪdʒ)
n
1. (Nautical Terms) nautical the lines and rigging of a vessel
2. (Forestry) an amount of wood measured in cords

cord•age

(ˈkɔr dɪdʒ)

n.
1. lines, hawsers, etc., esp. on the rigging of a vessel.
2. a quantity of wood measured in cords.
[1480–90]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cordage - the amount of wood in an area as measured in cords
quantity, measure, amount - how much there is or how many there are of something that you can quantify
2.cordage - the ropes in the rigging of a ship
rope - a strong line
sennit - flat braided cordage that is used on ships
Translations

cordage

[ˈkɔːdɪdʒ] Ncordaje m, cordería f

cordage

n no plTauwerk nt
References in classic literature ?
Unloosed from their lashing by the constant turning and twisting of the ship and the force of the wind, the boarding and landing tackle had been trailing beneath the keel, a tangled mass of cordage and leather.
Then all at once darkness fell upon me, and anon from out of it, as to one who grows accustomed by degrees to a dimmer light, my former surroundings of deck and mast and cordage slowly resolved themselves.
These gelves have given occasion to the report that out of the cocoa-tree alone a ship may be built, fitted out with masts, sails, and cordage, and victualled with bread, water, wine, sugar, vinegar, and oil.
Lank Bildad, as pilot, headed the first watch, and ever and anon, as the old craft deep dived into the green seas, and sent the shivering frost all over her, and the winds howled, and the cordage rang, his steady notes were heard, -- Sweet fields beyond the swelling flood, Stand dressed in living green.
However tightly moored, they range a little at their berths, swaying imperceptibly the spire- like assemblages of cordage and spars.
The anchors, the cordage, the instruments, the travelling-wraps, the awning, the provisions, and the arms, were put in the place assigned to them in the car.
At long intervals a flash of lightning clove it with a quivering line of fire that revealed a heaving world of water where was nothing before, kindled the dusky cordage to glittering silver, and lit up the faces of the men with a ghastly luster!
The evening breeze had sprung up, and though it was well warded off by the hill with the two peaks upon the east, the cordage had begun to sing a little softly to itself and the idle sails to rattle to and fro.
The seamen were all provided with cordage, which I had beforehand twisted to a sufficient strength.
These I had attached to the lashings which had been blown asunder by the explosion; at one end of the coop the ring-bolt had been torn clean out, but at the other it was the cordage that had parted.
To sailors, oaths are household words; they will swear in the trance of the calm, and in the teeth of the tempest; they will imprecate curses from the topsail-yard-arms, when most they teter over to a seething sea; but in all my voyagings, seldom have I heard a common oath when God's burning finger has been laid on the ship; when his mene, mene, Tekel Upharsin has been woven into the shrouds and the cordage.
In the first place, they have no mast, cordage, tackle, rigging, or other such boat-like gear; nor have they anything in their shape at all calculated to remind one of a boat's head, stem, sides, or keel.