cordiality


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cor·dial

 (kôr′jəl)
adj.
1.
a. Warm and sincere; friendly: a cordial welcome; very cordial relations.
b. Polite and respectful; formally pleasant: "He shook my hand, but not warmly; he was cordial, but not amiable" (Oliver Sacks).
2. Strongly felt; fervent: a cordial abhorrence of waste.
3. Archaic Invigorating; stimulating. Used especially of a beverage.
n.
1. A liqueur.
2. An invigorating or medicinal drink; a tonic.

[Middle English, of the heart, from Medieval Latin cordiālis, from Latin cor, cord-, heart; see kerd- in Indo-European roots.]

cor·dial′i·ty (-jăl′ĭ-tē, -jē-ăl′-, -dē-ăl′-), cor′dial·ness n.
cor′dial·ly adv.

cordiality

(ˌkɔːdɪˈælɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
warmth of feeling

cor•dial•i•ty

(kɔrˈdʒæl ɪ ti, ˌkɔr dʒiˈæl-; esp. Brit. -diˈæl-)

n., pl. -ties.
1. cordial quality.
2. an expression of cordial feeling.
[1590–1600]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cordiality - a cordial dispositioncordiality - a cordial disposition    
friendliness - a friendly disposition

cordiality

noun warmth, friendliness, affability, geniality, amiability, heartiness They want to solve the problem in an atmosphere of cordiality.

cordiality

noun
Translations
مَوَدَّه، شُعور وُدّي
srdečnost
hjertelighedvenlighed
innileiki

cordiality

[ˌkɔːdɪˈælɪtɪ] Ncordialidad f

cordiality

[ˌkɔːrdiˈælɪti] n (= friendliness) [atmosphere, treatment] → cordialité f

cordiality

cordiality

[ˌkɔːdɪˈælɪtɪ] ncordialità

cordial

(ˈkorːdiəl) , ((American) ˈko:rdʒl) adjective
(of greetings etc) warm and affectionate. a cordial welcome.
noun
a refreshing drink. lime juice cordial.
ˌcordiˈality (-ˈӕ-) noun
ˈcordially adverb
References in classic literature ?
Jessie, who had probably already learned from her sister the purport of Dick's confidences, had received him with equal cordiality and perhaps a more unqualified amusement; and now, when fairly lifted into the saddle by his tremulous but respectful hands, made a very charming picture of youthful and rosy satisfaction.
The beginning, however, of every visit displayed none but the properest feelings, and this being of necessity so short might be hoped to pass away in unsullied cordiality.
I was startled, I confess, by the alteration in his manners this morning;--he did not speak like himself, and did not return your kindness with any cordiality.
Reed would have endured my presence more complacently; her children would have entertained for me more of the cordiality of fellow-feeling; the servants would have been less prone to make me the scapegoat of the nursery.
Having shaken it with great cordiality, she pulled me towards her and said to Mr.
But, he was particular in stipulating that if I were not received with cordiality, or if I were not encouraged to repeat my visit as a visit which had no ulterior object but was simply one of gratitude for a favour received, then this experimental trip should have no successor.
The supper was almost gay and a particularly clever speech of the representative of the government, mingling the glories of the past with the successes of the future, caused the greatest cordiality to prevail.
The next day he went to dine with his friend, and was welcomed by Camilla, who received and treated him with great cordiality, knowing the affection her husband felt for him.
From this summary of what has taken place in other countries, whose situations have borne the nearest resemblance to our own, what reason can we have to confide in those reveries which would seduce us into an expectation of peace and cordiality between the members of the present confederacy, in a state of separation?
These restorations destroyed all the venerable dignity, cordiality, and patriarchal air of the old house.
They were the personification of cordiality and hospitality and I spent several days with them, resting and recuperating from my long and arduous experiences.
While Porthos and Mousqueton were breakfasting, with the appetites of convalescents and with that brotherly cordiality which unites men in misfortune, D'Artagnan related how Aramis, being wounded, was obliged to stop at Crevecoeur, how he had left Athos fighting at Amiens with four men who accused him of being a coiner, and how he, D'Artagnan, had been forced to run the Comtes de Wardes through the body in order to reach England.