core


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CORE

 (kôr)
abbr.
Congress of Racial Equality

core

 (kôr)
n.
1. The central or innermost part: a rod with a hollow core; the hard elastic core of a baseball.
2. The hard or fibrous central part of certain fruits, such as the apple or pear, containing the seeds.
3. The basic or most important part; the crucial element or essence: a small core of dedicated supporters; the core of the problem. See Synonyms at substance.
4. A set of subjects or courses that make up a required portion of a curriculum.
5. Electricity A soft iron rod in a coil or transformer that provides a path for and intensifies the magnetic field produced by the windings.
6.
a. Computers A memory, especially one consisting of a series of tiny doughnut-shaped masses of magnetic material.
b. One of the magnetic doughnut-shaped masses that make up such a memory. Also called magnetic core.
7. Geology The central portion of the earth below the mantle, beginning at a depth of about 2,900 kilometers (1,800 miles) and probably consisting of iron and nickel. It is made up of a liquid outer core and a solid inner core.
8. A mass of dry sand placed within a mold to provide openings or shape to a casting.
9. A reactor core.
10. A cylindrical sample of rock, ice, or other material obtained from the center of a mass by drilling or cutting.
11. The base or innermost part, such as soft or inferior wood, surrounded by an outer part or covering, such as veneer wood.
12. Archaeology A stone from which one or more flakes have been removed, serving as a source for such flakes or as a tool itself.
13. Anatomy The muscles in the trunk of the human body, including those of the abdomen and chest, that stabilize the spine, pelvis, and shoulders.
tr.v. cored, cor·ing, cores
1. To remove the core or innermost part from: core apples.
2.
a. To remove (a cylindrical sample) from something, such as a glacier.
b. To remove a cylindrical sample from (a glacier or soil layer, for example).
c. To remove small plugs of sod from (turf) in order to aerate it.
3. To form or build with a base or innermost part consisting of a different substance from that of the covering or outer part: a fiberglass boat deck that is cored with wood.
adj.
1. Of basic importance; essential: "Virtually all cultures around the world use the word heart to describe anything that is core, central, or foundational" (Robert A. Emmons).
2. Anatomy Of or relating to the muscles of the trunk of the human body: a core workout.

[Middle English.]

core

(kɔː)
n
1. (Botany) the central part of certain fleshy fruits, such as the apple or pear, consisting of the seeds and supporting parts
2.
a. the central, innermost, or most essential part of something: the core of the argument.
b. (as modifier): the core meaning.
3. (General Physics) a piece of magnetic material, such as soft iron, placed inside the windings of an electromagnet or transformer to intensify and direct the magnetic field
4. (Geological Science) geology the central part of the earth, beneath the mantle, consisting mainly of iron and nickel, which has an inner solid part surrounded by an outer liquid part
5. (Geological Science) a cylindrical sample of rock, soil, etc, obtained by the use of a hollow drill
6. (Metallurgy) shaped body of material (in metal casting usually of sand) supported inside a mould to form a cavity of predetermined shape in the finished casting
7. (General Physics) physics the region of a nuclear reactor in which the reaction takes place
8. (Furniture) a layer of wood serving as a backing for a veneer
9. (Computer Science) computing
a. one of several processing units working in parallel in a computer
b. a ferrite ring formerly used in a computer memory to store one bit of information
c. short for core store
d. (as modifier): core memory.
10. (Archaeology) archaeol a lump of stone or flint from which flakes or blades have been removed
11. (General Physics) physics the nucleus together with all complete electron shells of an atom
vb
(Cookery) (tr) to remove the core from (fruit)
[C14: of uncertain origin]
ˈcoreless adj

CORE

(kɔː)
(in the US) n acronym for
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) Congress of Racial Equality

core

(kɔr, koʊr)

n., v. cored, cor•ing. n.
1. the central part of a fleshy fruit, containing the seeds.
2. the central, innermost, or most essential part of anything.
3. the piece of iron, bundle of iron wires, or other ferrous material forming the central or inner portion in an electromagnet, induction coil, transformer, or the like.
4. (in mining, geology, etc.) a cylindrical sample of earth, mineral, or rock extracted from the ground so that the strata are undisturbed in the sample.
5. a lump of stone from which prehistoric humans struck flakes in order to make tools.
6. the central portion of the earth, having a radius of about 2100 mi. (3379 km) and believed to be composed mainly of iron and nickel in a molten state. Compare crust (def. 7), mantle (def. 3).
7. the region in a nuclear reactor that contains its fissionable material.
8. an assemblage of small magnetized ferrite rings used as a data-storage medium in some computers.
9. a thickness of base metal beneath a cladding.
v.t.
11. to remove the core of (fruit).
12. to cut from the central part.
13. to remove (a cylindrical sample) from the interior, as of the earth or a tree trunk.
[1275–1325; Middle English; orig. uncertain; perhaps < Old French cors body < Latin corpus]
core′less, adj.

CORE

or C.O.R.E.

(kɔr, koʊr)

n.
Congress of Racial Equality.

core

(kôr)
1. The hard or stringy central part of certain fruits, such as apples and pears, that contains the seeds.
2. The central or innermost portion of the Earth below the mantle, probably consisting of iron and nickel. It is divided into a liquid outer core, which begins at a depth of 1,800 miles (2,898 kilometers), and a solid inner core, which begins at a depth of 3,095 miles (4,983 kilometers).
3. A piece of magnetizable material, such as a rod of soft iron, that is placed inside an electrical coil or transformer to intensify and provide a path for the magnetic field produced by the current running through the wire windings.
4. The central part of a nuclear reactor where atomic fission occurs.
5. A long, cylindrical sample of soil, rock, or ice, collected with a drill to study the layers of material that are not visible from the surface.

Core

 a number of people or objects that form the centre or main part of a group, organization, or society; players in a curling match; miners in one shift, hence, core of people, 1622.

core


Past participle: cored
Gerund: coring

Imperative
core
core
Present
I core
you core
he/she/it cores
we core
you core
they core
Preterite
I cored
you cored
he/she/it cored
we cored
you cored
they cored
Present Continuous
I am coring
you are coring
he/she/it is coring
we are coring
you are coring
they are coring
Present Perfect
I have cored
you have cored
he/she/it has cored
we have cored
you have cored
they have cored
Past Continuous
I was coring
you were coring
he/she/it was coring
we were coring
you were coring
they were coring
Past Perfect
I had cored
you had cored
he/she/it had cored
we had cored
you had cored
they had cored
Future
I will core
you will core
he/she/it will core
we will core
you will core
they will core
Future Perfect
I will have cored
you will have cored
he/she/it will have cored
we will have cored
you will have cored
they will have cored
Future Continuous
I will be coring
you will be coring
he/she/it will be coring
we will be coring
you will be coring
they will be coring
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been coring
you have been coring
he/she/it has been coring
we have been coring
you have been coring
they have been coring
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been coring
you will have been coring
he/she/it will have been coring
we will have been coring
you will have been coring
they will have been coring
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been coring
you had been coring
he/she/it had been coring
we had been coring
you had been coring
they had been coring
Conditional
I would core
you would core
he/she/it would core
we would core
you would core
they would core
Past Conditional
I would have cored
you would have cored
he/she/it would have cored
we would have cored
you would have cored
they would have cored

core

The dense, intensely hot ball of rock below the Earth’s mantle. The outer core, 1400 mi (2240 km) thick, is probably molten iron and nickel with some silicon. The inner core, 1540 mi (2440 km) across, may be iron and nickel at 3700 °C. Extreme pressure prevents it from becoming liquid.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.core - a small group of indispensable persons or things; "five periodicals make up the core of their publishing program"
set - a group of things of the same kind that belong together and are so used; "a set of books"; "a set of golf clubs"; "a set of teeth"
cadre - a nucleus of military personnel capable of expansion
2.core - the center of an objectcore - the center of an object; "the ball has a titanium core"
midpoint, centre, center - a point equidistant from the ends of a line or the extremities of a figure
corn cob, corncob - the hard cylindrical core that bears the kernels of an ear of corn
3.core - the central part of the Earth
midpoint, centre, center - a point equidistant from the ends of a line or the extremities of a figure
4.core - the choicest or most essential or most vital part of some idea or experience; "the gist of the prosecutor's argument"; "the heart and soul of the Republican Party"; "the nub of the story"
cognitive content, mental object, content - the sum or range of what has been perceived, discovered, or learned
bare bones - (plural) the most basic facts or elements; "he told us only the bare bones of the story"
hypostasis - (metaphysics) essential nature or underlying reality
haecceity, quiddity - the essence that makes something the kind of thing it is and makes it different from any other
quintessence - the purest and most concentrated essence of something
stuff - a critically important or characteristic component; "suspense is the very stuff of narrative"
5.core - a cylindrical sample of soil or rock obtained with a hollow drill
sample - all or part of a natural object that is collected and preserved as an example of its class
6.CORE - an organization founded by James Leonard Farmer in 1942 to work for racial equality
NGO, nongovernmental organization - an organization that is not part of the local or state or federal government
7.core - the central meaning or theme of a speech or literary work
meaning, signification, import, significance - the message that is intended or expressed or signified; "what is the meaning of this sentence"; "the significance of a red traffic light"; "the signification of Chinese characters"; "the import of his announcement was ambiguous"
8.core - (computer science) a tiny ferrite toroid formerly used in a random access memory to store one bit of data; now superseded by semiconductor memories; "each core has three wires passing through it, providing the means to select and detect the contents of each bit"
core memory, magnetic core memory - (computer science) a computer memory consisting of an array of magnetic cores; now superseded by semiconductor memories
RAM, random access memory, random memory, random-access memory, read/write memory - the most common computer memory which can be used by programs to perform necessary tasks while the computer is on; an integrated circuit memory chip allows information to be stored or accessed in any order and all storage locations are equally accessible
computer science, computing - the branch of engineering science that studies (with the aid of computers) computable processes and structures
torus, toroid - a ring-shaped surface generated by rotating a circle around an axis that does not intersect the circle
9.core - the chamber of a nuclear reactor containing the fissile material where the reaction takes place
chamber - a natural or artificial enclosed space
nuclear reactor, reactor - (physics) any of several kinds of apparatus that maintain and control a nuclear reaction for the production of energy or artificial elements
10.core - a bar of magnetic material (as soft iron) that passes through a coil and serves to increase the inductance of the coil
bar - a rigid piece of metal or wood; usually used as a fastening or obstruction or weapon; "there were bars in the windows to prevent escape"
magnet - (physics) a device that attracts iron and produces a magnetic field
Verb1.core - remove the core or center from; "core an apple"
core out, hollow out, hollow - remove the interior of; "hollow out a tree trunk"

core

noun
1. centre Lava is molten rock from the earth's core
2. heart, essence, nucleus, kernel, crux, gist, nub, pith He has the ability to get straight to the core of a problem.

core

noun
1. A point of origin from which ideas or influences, for example, originate:
2. The most central and material part:
Law: gravamen.
Translations
قَلْب، لُب، نواهلُبّنواةيَنزَع نواة الثَّمَـره، يُجوِّف
jádřinecjádrovyjmout jádřinecjaderník
kernemidteudkernecentrumhjerte
siemenkotaydinennakkomaksuferriittirengasmuistikara
coeurcœur de métierfondnoyau
jezgra
kjarnitaka kjarna úr
핵심
esmėišimti šerdįišimti vidurįišpjauti šerdįišpjauti vidurį
augļa kodolsbūtībaizņemt serdikodolsserde
jadrovníkvybrať jadrovník
jedro
kärnhus
แกน
çekirdekgöbeğini/çekirdeğini çıkarmakgöbek
lõi

core

[kɔːʳ]
A. N
1. [of fruit] → corazón m; [of earth] → centro m, núcleo m; [of cable, nuclear reactor] → núcleo m
2. (fig) [of problem etc] → esencia f, meollo m; [of group etc] → centro m
English to the coreinglés hasta los tuétanos
rotten to the corecorrompido hasta la médula
shocked to the coreprofundamente afectado
a hard core of resistanceun núcleo or foco arraigado de resistencia
the hard core of unemploymentlos parados que tienen pocas posibilidades de salir de esa situación
B. VT [+ fruit] → deshuesar
C. CPD core business Nactividad f principal
core curriculum N (Scol) → asignaturas fpl comunes
core memory N (Comput) → memoria f de núcleos
core subject N (Scol, Univ) → asignatura f común
core time Nperíodo m nuclear

core

[ˈkɔːr]
n
[fruit] → trognon m
an apple core → un trognon de pomme
to be rotten to the core [institution] → être complètement pourri
[earth, planet] → noyau m
(= centre) → cœur m
[nuclear reactor] → cœur m
[problem] → cœur m
adj [values, issues, beliefs] → central(e); [activities, skills] → fondamental(e)
vt [+ apple] → enlever le trognon decore business nactivité f principalecore curriculum ntronc m communcore subject nmatière f principale

core

n (lit, fig)Kern m; (of apple, pear)Kernhaus nt, → Butzen m (dial); (of rock)Innere(s) nt; (of nuclear reactor)Kern m; rotten/English to the core (fig)durch und durch schlecht/englisch; shaken/shocked to the corezutiefst erschüttert/schockiert; to get to the core of the matter (fig)zum Kern der Sache kommen
adj attr issueKern-; (Sch) subjectHaupt-, Pflicht-; curriculumHaupt-; core (business) activity (Comm) → Kerngeschäft nt
vt fruitentkernen; apple, peardas Kernhaus (+gen)entfernen or ausschneiden

core

:
core time
nKernzeit f
core vocabulary

core

[kɔːʳ]
1. n (of fruit) → torsolo; (of cable) → centro; (of earth, nuclear reactor) → nucleo (Mineralogy) (sample) → carota; (of problem) → cuore m, nocciolo
a hard core of resistance → uno zoccolo duro di resistenza
rotten to the core → marcio/a fino al midollo
English to the core → inglese in tutto e per tutto
2. vt (fruit) → togliere il torsolo a

core

(koː) noun
the innermost part of something, especially fruit. an apple-core; the core of the earth.
verb
to take out the core of (fruit). Core the apples.

core

لُبّ jádřinec kerne Kerngehäuse πυρήνας corazón, núcleo siemenkota cœur jezgra torsolo 핵심 kern kjerne gniazdo nasienne caroço, núcleo сердцевина kärnhus แกน çekirdek lõi 果核

core

n. centro, corazón, núcleo.
References in classic literature ?
Time, however, overgrew this softness with the rough bark of manhood, and but few knew how living and fresh it still lay at the core.
When I saw my charmer thus come in accompanied by a cavalier, I seemed to hear a hiss, and the green snake of jealousy, rising on undulating coils from the moonlit balcony, glided within my waistcoat, and ate its way in two minutes to my heart's core.
All this time, he lay upon his bed, the very core and centre of a blaze of ruddy light, which streamed upon it when the clock proclaimed the hour; and which, being only light, was more alarming than a dozen ghosts, as he was powerless to make out what it meant, or would be at; and was sometimes apprehensive that he might be at that very moment an interesting case of spontaneous combustion, without having the consolation of knowing it.
Printed in full, it would make ten pages of this book; but the core of it is in the last sentence: "The method of, and apparatus for, transmitting vocal or other sounds telegraphically, by causing electrical undulations, similar in form to the vibrations of the air accompanying the said vocal or other sounds.
Sovereign and exalted Lady,- The pierced by the point of absence, the wounded to the heart's core, sends thee, sweetest Dulcinea del Toboso, the health that he himself enjoys not.
As she spoke I could see her husband's face darken and draw together, as though the passion in him were shriveling his being to its core.
But, no; on reflection, the procureur was not a merciless man; and it was not the magistrate, slave to his duties, but the friend, the loyal friend, who roughly but firmly cut into the very core of the corruption; it was not the executioner, but the surgeon, who wished to withdraw the honor of Danglars from ignominious association with the disgraced young man they had presented to the world as their son-in-law.
But these experiences of the morning have shaken me to the core, and I must rest awhile.
Olivain advanced, retired, then made his horse rear -- turned it and then, struck to the core by shame, leaped, as Raoul had done, only repeating:
The colour on her cheek was like the bloom on a good apple, which is as sound at the core as it is red on the rind.
The rind is perhaps an eighth of an inch in thickness; and denuded of this at the time when it is in the greatest perfection, the fruit presents a beautiful globe of white pulp, the whole of which may be eaten, with the exception of a slender core, which is easily removed.
de Bellegarde answered with suave concision that he thought as ill of them as possible, that they were going from bad to worse, and that the age was rotten to its core.