coreferential


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coreferential

(ˌkəʊrɛfəˈrɛnʃəl)
adj
(Linguistics) philosophy (of more than one linguistic expression) designating the same individual or class
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Adj.1.coreferential - relating to coreference
References in periodicals archive ?
Our experimentation has shown that this configuration highly suggests that the truck and it are coreferential (for details of this and other predictive coreference configurations, see McShane and Babkin [2016b]).
Wendan 'to turn' takes the accusative as a coreferential pronoun in the reflexive construction, while gewendan 'to turn' takes the dative, as in
On average, in various Spanish dialects over 40 percent of non-coreferential subjects are overt, while only about 25 percent of coreferential subjects are expressed (Shin & Cairns 2012).
1) The reflexive dative, a dative-preposition fused with a pronoun coreferential to the subject noun in (10a) and (10b), added optionally to verbs of position or motion as a means of accentuating, possibly thus lengthening the duration of, the activity--a construction extended from its classical function of heightened exhortation (cf.
Lexical anaphora occurs when this backpointing function is not assumed by a pronoun, but by a lexical item which is understood as coreferential with some earlier representation.
The heterogeneity hypothesis holds that coreferential concepts have very few properties in common--hence the term concept does not pick out a singular natural kind but heterogeneous kinds.
presents an overview of the debate about the differing cognitive value of coreferential names in light of Frege, Kripke and other philosophers of language.
Givon (1976) argues that subject agreement developed via the grammaticalization of topic coreferential pronouns.
But one might wonder how the pronouns and their associated noun phrase can be coreferential without being referential.
Among the characteristics of these clauses in Lakhota are: the order of the relative clause with respect to the main clause; the presence of two elements that share some characteristics typical of English relative pronouns; some sort of agreement among the relative clause and the marker on the head noun; and the omission of a shared argument between the main clause and the relative clause and the use of a coreferential marker on the verb.
This is not a conceptual or pragmatic necessity: in many cases an unrealized actor could be interpreted as impersonal or as coreferential with the subject of the clause.
Note that the post verbal NP is often a pronoun (62c) or an inalienably possessed nominal whose possessor is coreferential with the subject (62d).