coregent


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coregent

(kəʊˈriːdʒənt)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a joint regent
References in periodicals archive ?
1740-1780] and especially her son, coregent, and successor Joseph II [r.
This form of statue, in which an image of the donor holds an "emblem of a goddess," often a sistrum, first appears in the early years of Hatshepsut, when she was still acting as coregent to Thutmose III.
Cette fracturation metaphysique de l'equilibre cosmos / Homme fait de l'Homme une instance royale, un coregent cosmique.
He argues it was tied to the worship of his father, Amenhotep III, as the divine sun king, to whom Akhenaton served as coregent and intermediary on earth.
Thutmose III succeeded his stepmother and aunt, Hatshepsut, who was technically his regent and later coregent, actually serving as de facto ruler during Thutmose's infancy and much of his young adult life.
The daughter of Charles V, the Empress Mar[acute{i}]a was intimately familiar with the politics of the Spanish court, having served as coregent of Castile from 1548 to 1551.
Yet the 1624 letter sent by Archduchess Maria Maddalena, coregent (with her mother-in-law Cristina di Lorena) of Florence, in which she thanked Vittori's patron for allowing him to perform in Florence, was addressed to Cardinal Francesco, and the letter specifically returns Vittori to the service of Francesco and the pope (Florence, Archivio di Stato, Archivio Mediceo del Principato [ = I: Fas, M.
He was appointed coregent of Scotland, together with William Lamberton and John Comyn; he entered into a secret agreement with Lamberton, binding him to uphold the patriotic cause.
He had two options: either to start the count all over again with his name and the royal title this time, and, if so desired, accompanied by the name of his son Demetrius as coregent, or to continue the count he had started earlier with the addition of the royal title to his name (perhaps also here together with Demetrius).
On the Continent, on all the issues that matter, competitive politics decayed to a rotation of arrogant coregents of a hermetically sealed elite, and with predictable consequences: If the political culture forbids respect-able politicians from raising certain topics, then the electorate will turn to unrespectable ones.