corm


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Related to corm: Edible corm

corm

 (kôrm)
n.
A short thick solid food-storing underground stem, sometimes bearing papery scale leaves, as in the crocus or gladiolus.

[New Latin cormus, from Greek kormos, a trimmed tree trunk; see sker- in Indo-European roots.]

corm

(kɔːm)
n
(Botany) an organ of vegetative reproduction in plants such as the crocus, consisting of a globular stem base swollen with food and surrounded by papery scale leaves. Compare bulb1
[C19: from New Latin cormus, from Greek kormos tree trunk from which the branches have been lopped]
ˈcormous adj

corm

(kɔrm)

n.
an enlarged, fleshy, bulblike base of a plant stem that stores food, as in a crocus.
[1820–30; < New Latin cormus < Greek kormós a tree trunk with boughs lopped off, akin to keírein to cut off, hew]
corm′like`, adj.
cor′moid, adj.
cor′mous, adj.

corm

(kôrm)
A fleshy underground stem that is similar to a bulb but stores its food as stem tissue and has fewer and thinner leaf-like scales. The crocus and gladiolus produce new shoots from corms. Compare bulb, rhizome, runner, tuber.

corm

A swollen stem that has a bulb-like appearance, but without the scales of true bulbs. Corms usually have a papery outer skin. Unlike tubers, a new corm is produced annually.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.corm - solid swollen underground bulb-shaped stem or stem base and serving as a reproductive structurecorm - solid swollen underground bulb-shaped stem or stem base and serving as a reproductive structure
stalk, stem - a slender or elongated structure that supports a plant or fungus or a plant part or plant organ
Translations

corm

[kɔːm] N (Bot) → bulbo m

corm

nKnolle f

corm

[kɔːm] n (Bot) → cormo
References in periodicals archive ?
BEIRUT: Lebanon cannot overcome the negative impact of the world financial crisis if it does not reform its economic model to become more productive, former Finance Minister Georges Corm said Wednesday.
byzantinum produces up to 20 funnel shaped soft lilac flowers per corm and its white form, C.
This means corms are out of the soil and prone to all sorts of problems for some five months before they are started into growth again.
Edith Askew, by email, says: I've had a few of my cyclamen corms for a number of years and occasionally one fails to flower.
I'm talking about dahlias, chrysanthemums, gladioli, begonia corms and similar subjects - and I'd also include the more tropical-looking plants such as cannas.
To beat squirrels and mice, make a wire-mesh container and plant the corms in it so they are 15 cm (6in) deep.
In the case of dahlias that's the tubers, in the case of chrysanthemums the stems and the young shoots that emerge from them, and in the case of gladioli the new annual corm forming on the top of last year's, so the longer you can leave them the better.
Allow each corm to develop just one fruiting stalk.
Cut the foliage back to within an inch of the corm, clean off any soil and store in envelopes in a dry, frost-free place.
Discard the old corm beneath each new one, let them dry thoroughly in a shed or under glass, then cut off the foliage and store in a cool, airy, frost-free place.
Pot up cyclamen corms in moist compost with the top of the corm slightly above the compost surface.
I would advise filling a shallow seed tray with a peat-based compost, making a small depression with your finger so you can actually press the surface of the corm into contact with the peat.