cornea

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cor·ne·a

 (kôr′nē-ə)
n.
The transparent convex anterior portion of the outer fibrous coat of the eyeball that covers the iris and the pupil and is continuous with the sclera.

[Medieval Latin cornea (tēla), horny (tissue), from Latin corneus, horny, from cornū, horn; see ker- in Indo-European roots.]

cor′ne·al (-əl) adj.

cornea

(ˈkɔːnɪə)
n, pl -neas (-nɪəz) or -neae (-nɪˌiː)
(Anatomy) the convex transparent membrane that forms the anterior covering of the eyeball and is continuous with the sclera
[C14: from Medieval Latin cornea tēla horny web, from Latin cornū horn]
ˈcorneal adj

cor•ne•a

(ˈkɔr ni ə)

n., pl. -ne•as.
the transparent anterior part of the external coat of the eye covering the iris and the pupil and continuous with the sclera.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Medieval Latin cornea horny (web or tunic), feminine of corneus corneous]
cor′ne•al, adj.

cor·ne·a

(kôr′nē-ə)
The tough transparent membrane of the outer layer of the eyeball that covers the iris and the pupil. See more at eye.

cornea

A transparent convex membrane forming part of the eye’s outer coat in front of the iris and pupil.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cornea - the transparent dome-shaped anterior portion of the outer covering of the eyecornea - the transparent dome-shaped anterior portion of the outer covering of the eye; it covers the iris and pupil and is continuous with the sclera
eye, oculus, optic - the organ of sight
arcus, arcus senilis - a whitish deposit in the shape of an arc that is sometimes seen in the cornea
tissue layer, membrane - a pliable sheet of tissue that covers or lines or connects the organs or cells of animals or plants
Translations
قَرْنِيَّة العيْن
rohovka
corneahornhinde
szaruhártya
hornhimna
ragena
radzene
rohovka
gözün saydam tabakası

cornea

[ˈkɔːnɪə] N (corneas or corneae (pl)) [ˈkɔːnɪiː]córnea f

cornea

[ˈkɔːrniə] ncornée f

cornea

nHornhaut f, → Cornea f (spec)

cornea

[ˈkɔːnɪə] n (Anat) → cornea

cornea

(ˈkoːniə) noun
the transparent covering of the eyeball.

cor·ne·a

n. córnea, parte anterior transparente del globo del ojo.

cornea

n córnea
References in classic literature ?
In certain crustaceans, for instance, there is a double cornea, the inner one divided into facets, within each of which there is a lens-shaped swelling.
When the researchers removed the genes carrying POU6F2, the affected mice had thinner corneas than normal mice.
KARACHI -- The two corneas donated by a Karachi-based lady after her death on Friday were successfully transplanted into two blind patients at Pakistan Eye Bank Society (PEBS).
Currently, donor corneas - the eye's clear outer covering - are generally not used for surgery if they have been preserved for longer than seven days.
Researchers at Newcastle University and the University of California have developed a new method to grow better artificial corneas by controlling the behaviour of cells in a dish.
This shortage has worsened in recent years, as corneas cannot be used from anyone who has had laser eye surgery.
But donor corneas are in short supply and the operations don't always work.
Treatments that suppress the immune system's response to the foreign corneas, such as steroid eye drops, can help prevent or reverse rejection.
Many people in Oman who are suffering from infections in their corneas need transplants, but only a few are being admitted to Omani hospitals due to eye injuries.
We found that in contrast to the effect of nanofibers alone (MSCs-free), where profound enzymatic antioxidant/prooxidant imbalance was found in the corneal epithelium, after the treatment of injured corneas with BM-MSCs nanofibers or LSCs nanofibers (less after Ad-MSCs nanofibers), the enzymatic antioxidant protective mechanism was restored in the regenerated corneal epithelium.
Methods: Fresh dog corneas were decellularized by serial digestion, and LCT was performed on rabbit eyes using xenogeneic decellularized corneal matrix.
The study of 663 participants found that at 10 years, the transplant success rates for corneas from donors aged 12 to 65 and aged 6 to 75 remained similar, at 77% and 71%.