cornelian cherry


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cornelian cherry

n.
1. A deciduous Eurasian shrub or small tree (Cornus mas) cultivated for its clusters of early blooming, small yellow flowers and cherrylike, edible, sour fruits.
2. The fruit of this plant, used for jellies and preserves.

[From cornel.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cornelian cherry - deciduous European shrub or small tree having bright red fruitcornelian cherry - deciduous European shrub or small tree having bright red fruit
cornel, dogwood, dogwood tree - a tree of shrub of the genus Cornus often having showy bracts resembling flowers
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
A parade of spring flowering trees starts with the yellow-blooming (in April) Cornelian cherry or (in May) the native, white flowering dogwood, or the (June-blooming) Japanese dogwood.
It's this proprietary blend of noni, blueberry, olive, and cornelian cherry that makes Max the most powerful adaptogenic supplement on the market today.
The Cornelian cherry or Sorbet, as it is commonly known, forms a very large shrub, up to 3 metres (10') tall that, during January and February, is covered in thousands of small yellow flowers on naked stems.
The Cornelian Cherry (Cornus mas) also produces bright red cherry like fruit and leaves that turn a reddish-purple in autumn.
The botanical name for dogwood is Cornus , the Latin term for the cornelian cherry, Cornus mas, which grows to a 3m (10ft) tree, has clusters of small yellow flowers before the leaves open, in late winter, and offers that edible bonus of bright red berries.
We've got a cornelian cherry which has early yellow flowers and red berries later in the year.
For a really incredible winter display of glorious gold, the cornelian cherry (Cornus mas) is hard to beat and the same can be said of the fragrant witch hazel (Hamamelis mollis), with its spidery yellow flowers, and winter jasmine (Jasminum nudiflorum) which grows so well against a wall.
Cornelian cherry (Cornus mas) carries small yellow flowers on bare twigs in early spring, followed by clusters of bright scarlet fruit (good for making jelly or attracting birds).
Cornus Mas, the Cornelian Cherry, was traditionally used for making daggers and "dagger wood" eventually became "dogwood".
A ONE of my favourites is the Cornelian cherry (Cornus mas) which was last week's plant of the week.
In the northern parts of Canada, they generally smoke pure tobacco; but further north and around Montreal, they take the inner bark of the red Cornelian cherry, crush it, and mix it with the tobacco.