coronal mass ejection


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coronal mass ejection

n.
A very large emission of plasma from the sun that disrupts the flow of the solar wind, sometimes interfering with the operation of artificial satellites, electronic communications, and electric power transmission on Earth.

coronal mass ejection

n
a cloud of particles ejected from the sun's surface during a solar flare
References in periodicals archive ?
But lately the number of sunspots, solar flares and spectacular coronal mass ejections has gone up.
20 flare itself or by a coronal mass ejection associated with the eruption, says Bernhard Neck, a European Space Agency astrophysicist based at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.
A giant cloud of solar material called a coronal mass ejection escapes the sun in the second image, from the ESA/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory.
When a coronal mass ejection nears Earth, it can wreak havoc.
Coronal mass ejection or CME is a solar phenomenon that can send billions of tons of particles into space that can reach Earth one to three days later.
This process lies at the heart of giant explosions on the sun, such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections, which can fling radiation and particles across the solar system.
While typical coronal mass ejections from the Sun take two or three days to reach Earth, the 2012 event traveled from the Sun's surface to Earth in just 18 hours.
The largest coronal mass ejection now hurtling toward the edge of the solar system thankfully missed Earth altogether.
A coronal mass ejection - or a massive burst of solar wind and magnetic fields - that erupted from the Sun in March 2012 provided scientists with the data they needed.
Washington, June 22 ( ANI ): The sun erupted with an Earth-directed coronal mass ejection or CME on June 20 at 11:24 pm.
An especially powerful type of solar eruption, known as a coronal mass ejection, can inject protons directly into Earth's atmosphere.
Khan and Hudson speculated that these shock waves had rammed into the loops, breaking them up and releasing a torrent of hot, X-ray-emitting material that became a coronal mass ejection.