coronation


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Related to coronation: Coronation chicken

cor·o·na·tion

 (kôr′ə-nā′shən, kŏr′-)
n.
The act or ceremony of crowning a sovereign or the sovereign's consort.

[Middle English coronacioun, from Medieval Latin corōnātiō, corōnātiōn-, from Latin corōnātus, past participle of corōnāre, to crown, from corōna, crown; see crown.]

coronation

(ˌkɒrəˈneɪʃən)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the act or ceremony of crowning a monarch
[C14: from Old French, from coroner to crown, from Latin corōnāre]

cor•o•na•tion

(ˌkɔr əˈneɪ ʃən, ˌkɒr-)

n.
the act or ceremony of crowning a king, queen, or other sovereign.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Anglo-French < Medieval Latin corōnātiō = Latin coronā(re) to deck with garlands, crown, v. derivative of corōna crown + -tio -tion]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.coronation - the ceremony of installing a new monarchcoronation - the ceremony of installing a new monarch
induction, initiation, installation - a formal entry into an organization or position or office; "his initiation into the club"; "he was ordered to report for induction into the army"; "he gave a speech as part of his installation into the hall of fame"
Translations
bekroning
korunovace
kroning
kronado
राजतिलक
koronázáskoronázási szertartás
krÿning
karūnavimas
kronēšana
taç giyme töreni

coronation

[ˌkɒrəˈneɪʃən] Ncoronación f

coronation

[ˌkɒrəˈneɪʃən] ncouronnement m

coronation

n
Krönung f
in cpdsKrönungs-; coronation robesKrönungsgewänder pl

coronation

[ˌkɒrəˈneɪʃn] nincoronazione f

coronation

(korəˈneiʃən) noun
the act or ceremony of crowning a king or queen.
References in classic literature ?
The dim reflection of a remembered splendour, a colourless and manifold diluted repetition of what they had beheld in proud old London -- we will not say at a royal coronation, but at a Lord Mayor's show -- might be traced in the customs which our forefathers instituted, with reference to the annual installation of magistrates.
And who could tell whether, in that congregated caravan, Moby Dick himself might not temporarily be swimming, like the worshipped white-elephant in the coronation procession of the Siamese
In Frankfort at the Romer was a great mask-ball, at the coronation festival, and in the illuminated saloon, the clanging music invited to dance, and splendidly appeared the rich toilets and charms of the ladies, and the festively costumed Princes and Knights.
The King of Ceilan rode through his city with a large ruby in his hand, as the ceremony of his coronation.
To gain this end, he loaded several of his own slaves with rich gifts, and presented himself at their head to the king, saying that they were from the new king on his coronation.
I was then in Germany, attracted thither by the wars in that country, which have not yet been brought to a termination; and as I was returning to the army from the coronation of the emperor, the setting in of winter arrested me in a locality where, as I found no society to interest me, and was besides fortunately undisturbed by any cares or passions, I remained the whole day in seclusion, with full opportunity to occupy my attention with my own thoughts.
Why," said Albert, "he was talked about for a week; then the coronation of the queen of England took place, followed by the theft of Mademoiselle Mars's diamonds; and so people talked of something else.
There was likewise a silver coronation medal of George the Third.
I should like to have seen a gallery of coronation beauties, at Westminster Abbey, confronted for a moment by this band of island girls; their stiffness, formality, and affectation, contrasted with the artless vivacity and unconcealed natural graces of these savage maidens.
In open-mouthed wonder the lama turned to this and that, and finally checked in rapt attention before a large alto- relief representing a coronation or apotheosis of the Lord Buddha.
Letterblair was a widower, and they dined alone, copiously and slowly, in a dark shabby room hung with yellowing prints of "The Death of Chatham" and "The Coronation of Napoleon.
That which all things tend to educe; which freedom, cultivation, intercourse, revolutions, go to form and deliver, is character; that is the end of Nature, to reach unto this coronation of her king.