corps


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Related to corps: Peace Corps

corps

 (kôr)
n. pl. corps (kôrz)
1.
a. A separate branch or department of the armed forces having a specialized function.
b. A tactical unit of ground combat forces between a division and an army commanded by a lieutenant general and composed of two or more divisions and auxiliary service troops.
2. A body of persons acting together or associated under common direction: the press corps.

[French, from Old French, from Latin corpus, body; see kwrep- in Indo-European roots.]

corps

(kɔː)
n, pl corps (kɔːz)
1. (Military) a military formation that comprises two or more divisions and additional support arms
2. (Military) a military body with a specific function: intelligence corps; medical corps.
3. a body of people associated together: the diplomatic corps.
[C18: from French, from Latin corpus body]

corps

(kɔr, koʊr)

n., pl. corps (kôrz, kōrz).
1.
a. an organization of officers and enlisted personnel or of officers alone: the U.S. Marine Corps.
b. a combat unit comprising two or more divisions.
2. a group of persons associated or acting together.
[1225–75; Middle English corps, cors < Middle French < Latin corpus body; compare corpse]

corps

Corps

 a body of men assigned to a special service, usually military; a number of students; members of an organization who wear uniforms, as St. John Ambulance Corps.
Examples: corps of actors [Dramatic Corps], 1831; of anatomists—Mensa; Corps de Ballet, 1845; of counsellors [legal], 1803; of giraffes; of instructors, 1859; ragged corps of labourers, 1832; of writers, 1882.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.corps - an army unit usually consisting of two or more divisions and their supportcorps - an army unit usually consisting of two or more divisions and their support
army unit - a military unit that is part of an army
army, ground forces, regular army - a permanent organization of the military land forces of a nation or state
Women's Army Corps, WAC - an army corps that was organized in World War II but is no longer a separate branch of the United States Army
Reserve Officers Training Corps, ROTC - a training program to prepare college students to be commissioned officers
division - an army unit large enough to sustain combat; "two infantry divisions were held in reserve"
2.corps - a body of people associated together; "diplomatic corps"
body - a group of persons associated by some common tie or occupation and regarded as an entity; "the whole body filed out of the auditorium"; "the student body"; "administrative body"
corps diplomatique, diplomatic corps, diplomatic service - the body of diplomatic personnel

corps

noun team, unit, regiment, detachment, company, body, band, division, troop, squad, crew, contingent, squadron an officer in the Army Medical Corps

corps

noun
1. A group of people acting together in a shared activity:
2. A group of people organized for a particular purpose:
Translations
السِّلك الدِبلوماسيقِطْعَـه عَسْكَـريّـه
sbor
korps
korpus
armeijakuntakunta
alakulat
deildhópur, deild
korpusas
korpuss
kår

corps

[kɔːʳ]
A. N (corps (pl)) [kɔːz] (Mil) → cuerpo m (de ejército)
see also diplomatic, press D
B. CPD corps de ballet Ncuerpo m de baile

corps

[ˈkɔːr] [corps] [ˈkɔːr ˈkɔːrz] (pl) n (in army)corps m

corps

n pl <-> (Mil) → Korps nt

corps

[kɔːʳ] n (corps (pl)) [kɔːz]corpo
press corps → ufficio m stampa inv

corps

(koː) plural corps (koːz) noun
1. a division of an army. The Royal Armoured Corps.
2. a group or company. the diplomatic corps.
References in classic literature ?
That which at first was only rumor, soon became certainty, as orders passed from the quarters of the commander-in-chief to the several corps he had selected for this service, to prepare for their speedy departure.
So, one fine morning I ascended the flight of granite steps, with the President's commission in my pocket, and was introduced to the corps of gentlemen who were to aid me in my weighty responsibility as chief executive officer of the Custom-House.
She is fairly introduced into our corps be ballet, and will figure, from time to time, in her turn, with other performers.
The solemnity is simple; the five corps assemble at night, and at a signal they all fall loading themselves with beer, out of pint-mugs, as fast as possible, and each man keeps his own count--usually by laying aside a lucifer match for each mud he empties.
Our residence at Canterbury, and our local connexion, will, no doubt, enable him to take advantage of any vacancy that may arise in the Cathedral corps.
To mee, who with eternal Famin pine, Alike is Hell, or Paradise, or Heaven, There best, where most with ravin I may meet; Which here, though plenteous, all too little seems To stuff this Maw, this vast unhide-bound Corps.
Sur une gamme chromatique, Le sein de peries ruisselant, La Venus de l'Adriatique Sort de l'eau son corps rose et blanc.
But the room seemed a palace to the brats of the corps de ballet, who were lodged in common dressing-rooms where they spent their time singing, quarreling, smacking the dressers and hair-dressers and buying one another glasses of cassis, beer, or even rhum, until the call-boy's bell rang.
And in 1890, he gathered around him a winnowed group of college graduates--he has sixty of them on his staff to-day--so that he might bequeath to the telephone an engineering corps of loyal and efficient men.
But I can say this much, that the choice he made of going to the wars was attended with such success, that by his gallant conduct and courage, and without any help save his own merit, he rose in a few years to be captain of infantry, and to see himself on the high-road and in position to be given the command of a corps before long; but Fortune was against him, for where he might have expected her favour he lost it, and with it his liberty, on that glorious day when so many recovered theirs, at the battle of Lepanto.
He soon appeared before the city with a corps of ten thousand troops, and finding it a fit occasion, as he had secretly intended from the beginning, to revive an antiquated claim, on the pretext that his ancestors had suffered the place to be dismembered from his territory,[1] he took possession of it in his own name, disarmed, and punished the inhabitants, and reannexed the city to his domains.
It can place the militia under one plan of discipline, and, by putting their officers in a proper line of subordination to the Chief Magistrate, will, as it were, consolidate them into one corps, and thereby render them more efficient than if divided into thirteen or into three or four distinct independent companies.