corpus


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cor·pus

 (kôr′pəs)
n. pl. cor·po·ra (-pər-ə)
1. A large collection of writings of a specific kind or on a specific subject.
2. A collection of writings or recorded remarks used for linguistic analysis.
3. Economics
a. The capital or principal amount, as of an estate or trust.
b. The principal of a bond.
4. Anatomy
a. The main part of a bodily structure or organ.
b. A distinct bodily mass or organ having a specific function.
5. The overall length of a violin.

[Middle English, from Latin; see kwrep- in Indo-European roots.]

corpus

(ˈkɔːpəs)
n, pl -pora (-pərə)
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a collection or body of writings, esp by a single author or on a specific topic: the corpus of Dickens' works.
2. the main body, section, or substance of something
3. (Anatomy) anatomy
a. any distinct mass or body
b. the main part of an organ or structure
4. (Plants) the inner layer or layers of cells of the meristem at a shoot tip, which produces the vascular tissue and pith. Compare tunica2
5. (Linguistics) linguistics a body of data, esp the finite collection of grammatical sentences of a language that a linguistic theory seeks to describe by means of an algorithm
6. (Banking & Finance) a capital or principal sum, as contrasted with a derived income
7. obsolete a human or animal body, esp a dead one
[C14: from Latin: body]

cor•pus

(ˈkɔr pəs)

n., pl. -po•ra (-pər ə)
for 1-3,5, -pus•es for 4.
1. a large or complete collection of writings: the entire corpus of Old English poetry.
2. the body of a person or animal, esp. when dead.
3.
a. a mass of body tissue that has a specialized function.
b. the main part of a bodily organ.
4. a collection of utterances, as spoken or written sentences, taken as a representative sample of a given language or dialect and used for linguistic analysis.
[1225–75; Middle English < Latin]

Corpus

 collection of writings on a subject; writings by an author or group of authors.
Examples: corpus of Christian tradition, 1865; of civil law, 1727; of Oriental numismatics, 1886; of the Greek poets, 1727; of scripture, 1876.

corpus

A distinctive mass of tissue; the major part of an organ.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.corpus - capital as contrasted with the income derived from it
capital - wealth in the form of money or property owned by a person or business and human resources of economic value
2.corpus - a collection of writings; "he edited the Hemingway corpus"
aggregation, collection, accumulation, assemblage - several things grouped together or considered as a whole
3.corpus - the main part of an organ or other bodily structure
body part - any part of an organism such as an organ or extremity
part, piece - a portion of a natural object; "they analyzed the river into three parts"; "he needed a piece of granite"

corpus

noun collection, body, whole, compilation, entirety, oeuvre (French), complete works a corpus of over 450 million words of spoken and written English

corpus

noun
1. A measurable whole:
2. Anatomy. The main part:
Translations

corpus

[ˈkɔːpəs]
A. N (corpuses or corpora (pl)) → cuerpo m
B. CPD corpus delicti Ncuerpo m del delito
Corpus Christi NCorpus m

corpus

[ˈkɔːrpəs] [corpora] [ˈkɔːrpərə] (pl) n (LINGUISTICS)corpus m

corpus

n
(= collection)Korpus m; (of opinions)Paket nt
(= main body)Großteil m; the main corpus of his workder Hauptteil seiner Arbeit
(Fin) → Stammkapital nt

corpus

[ˈkɔːpəs] n (corpora (pl)) [ˈkɔːpərə]corpus m
References in classic literature ?
The struggle was for chartered rights--for English liberties--for the cause of Algernon Sidney and John Hampden--for trial by jury- -the Habeas Corpus and Magna Charta.
I forgot to say that Chrysostom, who is dead, was a great man for writing verses, so much so that he made carols for Christmas Eve, and plays for Corpus Christi, which the young men of our village acted, and all said they were excellent.
The trial by jury in criminal cases, aided by the habeas corpus act, seems therefore to be alone concerned in the question.
But this was not so easy a matter, for the streets were thronged with people, and Rome was already a prey to that low and feverish murmur which precedes all great events; and at Rome there are four great events in every year, -- the Carnival, Holy Week, Corpus Christi, and the Feast of St.
The Privilege of the Writ of Habeas Corpus shall not be suspended, unless when in Cases of Rebellion or Invasion the public Safety may require it.
Tiberius in dissimulation; as Tacitus saith of him, Jam Tiberium vires et corpus, non dissimulatio, deserebant.
Too much red tape, habeas corpus and that sort of thing.
Instead of habeas corpus you would get post mortems.
This was Corpus Christi Day, a feast founded by Pope Urban IV in 1264.
Thucydides quotes the Delian "Hymn to Apollo", and it is possible that the Homeric corpus of his day also contained other of the more important hymns.
Corpus Christi, in the county of Nueces, and all the cities situated on the Rio Bravo, Laredo, Comalites, San Ignacio on the Web, Rio Grande City on the Starr, Edinburgh in the Hidalgo, Santa Rita, Elpanda, Brownsville in the Cameron, formed an imposing league against the pretensions of Florida.
In 1311 a new impetus was given to the whole ceremony by the establishment of the late spring festival of Corpus Christi, a celebration of the doctrine of transubstantiation.