correct


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

cor·rect

 (kə-rĕkt′)
v. cor·rect·ed, cor·rect·ing, cor·rects
v.tr.
1.
a. To make or put right: correct a mistake; correct a misunderstanding.
b. To remove the errors or mistakes from: corrected her previous testimony.
c. To indicate or mark the errors in: correct an exam.
2.
a. To speak to or communicate with (someone) in order to point out a mistake or error.
b. To scold or punish so as to improve or reform.
3. To remedy or counteract (a defect, for example): The new glasses corrected his blurry vision.
4. To adjust so as to meet a required standard or condition: correct the wheel alignment on a car.
v.intr.
1. To make corrections.
2. To make adjustments; compensate: correcting for the effects of air resistance.
adj.
1. Free from error or fault; true or accurate.
2. Conforming to standards; proper: correct behavior.

[Middle English correcten, from Latin corrigere, corrēct- : com-, intensive pref.; see com- + regere, to rule; see reg- in Indo-European roots.]

cor·rect′a·ble, cor·rect′i·ble adj.
cor·rect′ly adv.
cor·rect′ness n.
cor·rec′tor n.
Synonyms: correct, rectify, remedy, redress, revise, amend
These verbs mean to make right what is wrong. Correct refers to eliminating faults, errors, or defects: I corrected the spelling mistakes. The new design corrected the flaws in the earlier version.
Rectify stresses the idea of bringing something into conformity with a standard of what is right: "It is dishonest to claim that we can rectify racial injustice without immediate cost" (Mari J. Matsuda).
Remedy involves removing or counteracting something considered a cause of harm, damage, or discontent: He took courses to remedy his abysmal ignorance.
Redress refers to setting right something considered immoral or unethical and usually involves some kind of recompense: "They said he had done very little to redress the abuses that the army had committed against the civilian population" (Daniel Wilkinson).
Revise suggests change that results from careful reconsideration: The agency revised its safety recommendations in view of the new findings.
Amend implies improvement through alteration or correction: "Whenever [the people] shall grow weary of the existing government, they can exercise their constitutional right of amending it, or their revolutionary right to dismember or overthrow it" (Abraham Lincoln).

correct

(kəˈrɛkt)
vb (tr)
1. to make free from errors
2. to indicate the errors in
3. to rebuke or punish in order to set right or improve: to correct a child; to stand corrected.
4. to counteract or rectify (a malfunction, ailment, etc): these glasses will correct your sight.
5. to adjust or make conform, esp to a standard
adj
6. free from error; true; accurate: the correct version.
7. in conformity with accepted standards: correct behaviour.
[C14: from Latin corrigere to make straight, put in order, from com- (intensive) + regere to rule]
corˈrectable, corˈrectible adj
corˈrectly adv
corˈrectness n
corˈrector n

cor•rect

(kəˈrɛkt)

v.t.
1. to set or make right; remove the errors or faults from.
2. to point out or mark the errors in: to correct examination papers.
3. to rebuke or punish in order to improve: Don't correct your child in public.
4. to counteract the operation or effect of (something hurtful or undesirable).
5. to alter or adjust so as to bring into accordance with a standard or with a required condition.
v.i.
6. (of stock prices) to reverse a trend, esp. temporarily, as after a sharp advance or decline in previous trading sessions.
adj.
7. conforming to fact or truth; accurate.
8. in accordance with an acknowledged or accepted standard; proper: correct behavior.
[1300–50; (v.) Middle English (< Anglo-French correcter) < Latin corrēctus, past participle of corrigere to make straight =cor- cor- + -rigere, comb. form of regere to guide, rule; (adj.) (< French correct) < Latin]
cor•rect′a•ble, cor•rect′i•ble, adj.
cor•rect`a•bil′i•ty, cor•rect`i•bil′i•ty, n.
cor•rect′ing•ly, adv.
cor•rect′ly, adv.
cor•rect′ness, n.
cor•rec′tor, n.
syn: correct, accurate, precise imply conformity to fact, standard, or truth. A correct statement is one free from error, mistakes, or faults: The student gave a correct answer in class. An accurate statement is one that, as a result of an active effort to comprehend and verify, shows careful conformity to fact, truth, or spirit: The two witnesses said her account of the accident was accurate. A precise statement shows scrupulously strict and detailed conformity to fact: The chemist gave a precise explanation of the experiment.

correct


Past participle: corrected
Gerund: correcting

Imperative
correct
correct
Present
I correct
you correct
he/she/it corrects
we correct
you correct
they correct
Preterite
I corrected
you corrected
he/she/it corrected
we corrected
you corrected
they corrected
Present Continuous
I am correcting
you are correcting
he/she/it is correcting
we are correcting
you are correcting
they are correcting
Present Perfect
I have corrected
you have corrected
he/she/it has corrected
we have corrected
you have corrected
they have corrected
Past Continuous
I was correcting
you were correcting
he/she/it was correcting
we were correcting
you were correcting
they were correcting
Past Perfect
I had corrected
you had corrected
he/she/it had corrected
we had corrected
you had corrected
they had corrected
Future
I will correct
you will correct
he/she/it will correct
we will correct
you will correct
they will correct
Future Perfect
I will have corrected
you will have corrected
he/she/it will have corrected
we will have corrected
you will have corrected
they will have corrected
Future Continuous
I will be correcting
you will be correcting
he/she/it will be correcting
we will be correcting
you will be correcting
they will be correcting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been correcting
you have been correcting
he/she/it has been correcting
we have been correcting
you have been correcting
they have been correcting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been correcting
you will have been correcting
he/she/it will have been correcting
we will have been correcting
you will have been correcting
they will have been correcting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been correcting
you had been correcting
he/she/it had been correcting
we had been correcting
you had been correcting
they had been correcting
Conditional
I would correct
you would correct
he/she/it would correct
we would correct
you would correct
they would correct
Past Conditional
I would have corrected
you would have corrected
he/she/it would have corrected
we would have corrected
you would have corrected
they would have corrected
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.correct - make right or correct; "Correct the mistakes"; "rectify the calculation"
change by reversal, reverse, turn - change to the contrary; "The trend was reversed"; "the tides turned against him"; "public opinion turned when it was revealed that the president had an affair with a White House intern"
remediate, remedy, amend, rectify, repair - set straight or right; "remedy these deficiencies"; "rectify the inequities in salaries"; "repair an oversight"
debug - locate and correct errors in a computer program code; "debug this program"
falsify - falsify knowingly; "She falsified the records"
2.correct - make reparations or amends for; "right a wrongs done to the victims of the Holocaust"
alter, change, modify - cause to change; make different; cause a transformation; "The advent of the automobile may have altered the growth pattern of the city"; "The discussion has changed my thinking about the issue"
over-correct, overcompensate - make excessive corrections for fear of making an error
aby, abye, atone, expiate - make amends for; "expiate one's sins"
3.correct - censure severely; "She chastised him for his insensitive remarks"
flame - criticize harshly, usually via an electronic medium; "the person who posted an inflammatory message got flamed"
call on the carpet, chew out, chew up, chide, dress down, have words, bawl out, berate, rebuke, reproof, scold, take to task, call down, lambast, lambaste, lecture, reprimand, remonstrate, trounce, jaw, rag - censure severely or angrily; "The mother scolded the child for entering a stranger's car"; "The deputy ragged the Prime Minister"; "The customer dressed down the waiter for bringing cold soup"
4.correct - adjust for; "engineers will work to correct the effects or air resistance"
carry - compensate for a weaker partner or member by one's own performance; "I resent having to carry her all the time"
overcompensate, compensate, cover - make up for shortcomings or a feeling of inferiority by exaggerating good qualities; "he is compensating for being a bad father"
balance, equilibrise, equilibrize, equilibrate - bring into balance or equilibrium; "She has to balance work and her domestic duties"; "balance the two weights"
5.correct - punish in order to gain control or enforce obedience; "The teacher disciplined the pupils rather frequently"
penalise, penalize, punish - impose a penalty on; inflict punishment on; "The students were penalized for showing up late for class"; "we had to punish the dog for soiling the floor again"
6.correct - go down in value; "the stock market corrected"; "prices slumped"
come down, descend, go down, fall - move downward and lower, but not necessarily all the way; "The temperature is going down"; "The barometer is falling"; "The curtain fell on the diva"; "Her hand went up and then fell again"
7.correct - alter or regulate so as to achieve accuracy or conform to a standardcorrect - alter or regulate so as to achieve accuracy or conform to a standard; "Adjust the clock, please"; "correct the alignment of the front wheels"
alter, change, modify - cause to change; make different; cause a transformation; "The advent of the automobile may have altered the growth pattern of the city"; "The discussion has changed my thinking about the issue"
proportion - adjust in size relative to other things
modulate - adjust the pitch, tone, or volume of
temper - adjust the pitch (of pianos)
tune, tune up - adjust the pitches of (musical instruments); "My piano needs to be tuned"
calibrate, fine-tune, graduate - make fine adjustments or divide into marked intervals for optimal measuring; "calibrate an instrument"; "graduate a cylinder"
tune, tune up - adjust for (better) functioning; "tune the engine"
time - adjust so that a force is applied and an action occurs at the desired time; "The good player times his swing so as to hit the ball squarely"
trim - adjust (sails on a ship) so that the wind is optimally used
zero, zero in - adjust (as by firing under test conditions) the zero of (a gun); "He zeroed in his rifle at 200 yards"
zero - adjust (an instrument or device) to zero value
readjust, reset - adjust again after an initial failure
attune - adjust or accustom to; bring into harmony with
time - regulate or set the time of; "time the clock"
set - set to a certain position or cause to operate correctly; "set clocks or instruments"
regulate, modulate - fix or adjust the time, amount, degree, or rate of; "regulate the temperature"; "modulate the pitch"
focalise, focalize, sharpen, focus - put (an image) into focus; "Please focus the image; we cannot enjoy the movie"
sync, synchronize, synchronise - make synchronous and adjust in time or manner; "Let's synchronize our efforts"
pressurise, pressurize - increase the pressure in or of; "The captain will pressurize the cabin for the passengers' comfort"
depressurise, depressurize, decompress - decrease the pressure of; "depressurize the cabin in the air plane"
match, fit - make correspond or harmonize; "Match my sweater"
plumb - adjust with a plumb line so as to make vertical
ordinate, align, coordinate - bring (components or parts) into proper or desirable coordination correlation; "align the wheels of my car"; "ordinate similar parts"
reconcile, harmonise, harmonize - bring into consonance or accord; "harmonize one's goals with one's abilities"
linearise, linearize - make linear or get into a linear form; "a catalyst linearizes polyethylene"
justify - adjust the spaces between words; "justify the margins"
citify - accustom to urban ways; "Immigration will citify the country?"
8.correct - treat a defect; "The new contact lenses will correct for his myopia"
care for, treat - provide treatment for; "The doctor treated my broken leg"; "The nurses cared for the bomb victims"; "The patient must be treated right away or she will die"; "Treat the infection with antibiotics"
Adj.1.correct - free from error; especially conforming to fact or truth; "the correct answer"; "the correct version"; "the right answer"; "took the right road"; "the right decision"
accurate - conforming exactly or almost exactly to fact or to a standard or performing with total accuracy; "an accurate reproduction"; "the accounting was accurate"; "accurate measurements"; "an accurate scale"
proper - marked by suitability or rightness or appropriateness; "proper medical treatment"; "proper manners"
true - consistent with fact or reality; not false; "the story is true"; "it is undesirable to believe a proposition when there is no ground whatever for supposing it true"- B. Russell; "the true meaning of the statement"
incorrect, wrong - not correct; not in conformity with fact or truth; "an incorrect calculation"; "the report in the paper is wrong"; "your information is wrong"; "the clock showed the wrong time"; "found themselves on the wrong road"; "based on the wrong assumptions"
2.correct - socially right or correct; "it isn't right to leave the party without saying goodbye"; "correct behavior"
proper - marked by suitability or rightness or appropriateness; "proper medical treatment"; "proper manners"
3.correct - in accord with accepted standards of usage or procedure; "what's the right word for this?"; "the right way to open oysters"
proper - marked by suitability or rightness or appropriateness; "proper medical treatment"; "proper manners"
4.correct - correct in opinion or judgment; "time proved him right"

correct

adjective
1. accurate, right, true, exact, precise, flawless, faultless, on the right lines, O.K. or okay (informal) The information was correct at the time of going to press.
accurate wrong, false, incorrect, inaccurate, untrue
2. right, standard, regular, appropriate, acceptable, strict, proper, precise The use of the correct procedure is vital.
3. proper, seemly, standard, fitting, diplomatic, kosher (informal) They refuse to adopt the rules of correct behaviour.
proper unacceptable, inappropriate, unfitting, unsuitable, improper
verb
1. rectify, remedy, redress, right, improve, reform, cure, adjust, regulate, amend, set the record straight, emend He may need surgery to correct the problem.
rectify damage, harm, ruin, spoil, impair
2. rebuke, discipline, reprimand, chide, admonish, chastise, chasten, reprove, punish He gently corrected me for taking the Lord's name in vain.
rebuke praise, excuse, compliment
Quotations
"For whom the Lord loveth he correcteth" Bible: Proverbs

correct

verb
1. To make right what is wrong:
2. To subject (one) to a penalty for a wrong:
3. To castigate for the purpose of improving:
adjective
1. Having no errors:
4. Suitable for a particular person, condition, occasion, or place:
Translations
صحصححصحيحصَحيحصَحِيح
opravitsprávnýslušnýkorektníkorigovat
korrektretterigtigretafhjælpe
oikeaasiallinenkorrektioikaista
ispravanispraviti
helyeshibátlanillőkorrektkorrigál
leiîréttaleiîrétta, fara yfirréttur
訂正する正しい正す正解直す
바로잡다옳은
ištaisymaskoreguotikorektiškaikorektiškumaskorektyva
izlabotkorektskoriģētlabotpareizs
korigovaťmajúci pravdu
popravitipravilenpregledati
rättariktig
แก้ไขให้ถูกต้องถูกต้อง
đúngsửa chữa

correct

[kəˈrekt]
A. ADJ
1. (= accurate) → correcto
(that's) correct!¡correcto!, ¡exacto!
is this spelling correct?¿está bien escrito esto?
your suspicions are correctestá en lo cierto con sus sospechas
"correct fare only" (in buses etc) → importe exacto
to be correct [person] → tener razón, estar en lo cierto
am I correct in saying that ...?¿me equivoco al decir que ...?, ¿estoy en lo cierto al decir que ...?
he was normally correct in his calculationsnormalmente sus cálculos eran exactos
he was correct to blame the governmentestuvo en lo cierto cuando culpó al gobierno
the president was correct to reject the offerel presidente hizo bien al rechazar la oferta
it is correct to say thates acertado decir que ...
have you got the correct time?¿tiene la hora exacta?
2. (= appropriate) → adecuado
the correct weight for your height and buildel peso adecuado dadas su altura y constitución
in the correct placeen su sitio
3. (= proper) [person, behaviour, manners] → correcto; [dress] → apropiado
it's the correct thing to does lo correcto
B. VT
1. (= put right) [+ mistake, habit, exam, eyesight] → corregir; [+ person] → corregir, rectificar; [+ imbalance] → eliminar; [+ clock] → poner en hora
"I don't mean tomorrow," she corrected herself-no, no mañana -se corrigió
correct me if I'm wrongdime si tengo razón o no
correct me if I'm wrong, buta lo mejor me equivoco, pero ...
I stand correctedreconozco mi error
2. (frm) (= punish) → castigar; (= admonish) → reprender

correct

[kəˈrɛkt]
adj
(= accurate) → correct(e), exact(e)
That's correct → C'est exact.
You are correct
BUT Vous avez raison.
[choice, answer] → bon(ne)
the correct choice → le bon choix
the correct answer → la bonne réponse
(= proper) → correct(e), convenable
vt [+ person, mistake] → corriger; [+ homework, exam papers] → corriger
correct me if I'm wrong → corrigez-moi si j'ai tortcorrecting fluid nliquide m correcteur

correct

adj
(= right)richtig; answer, pronunciation alsokorrekt; time alsogenau; to be correct (person) → recht haben; to be correct in one’s estimates/assessmentrichtig schätzen/einschätzen; am I correct in thinking that …?gehe ich recht in der Annahme, dass …?; correct money or change onlynur abgezähltes Geld, nur passenden Betrag
(= proper, suitable, perfectly mannered)korrekt; it’s the correct thing to dodas gehört sich so; she was correct to reject the offeres war richtig, dass sie das Angebot abgelehnt hat
vt
korrigieren; person, pronunciation, error etc alsoberichtigen, verbessern; bad habitsich/jdm abgewöhnen; to correct proofsKorrektur lesen; correct me if I’m wrongSie können mich gern berichtigen; I stand correctedich nehme alles zurück
(old, by punishment, scolding) → maßregeln; (by corporal punishment) → züchtigen

correct

[kəˈrɛkt]
1. adj (answer) → corretto/a, esatto/a, giusto/a; (temperature, time, amount, forecast) → esatto/a, giusto/a; (behaviour) → corretto/a; (dress) → adatto/a; (procedure) → giusto/a, corretto/a
you are correct → ha ragione
2. vt (mistake, work, proofs) → correggere
I stand corrected → (ametto che) ho torto

correct

(kəˈrekt) verb
1. to remove faults and errors from. These spectacles will correct his eye defect.
2. (of a teacher etc) to mark errors in. I have fourteen exercise books to correct.
adjective
1. free from faults or errors. This sum is correct.
2. right; not wrong. Did I get the correct idea from what you said?; You are quite correct.
corˈrection (-ʃən) noun
corˈrective (-tiv) adjective
setting right. corrective treatment.
corˈrectly adverb
corˈrectness noun

correct

صَحِيح, يُصَحِّحُ opravit, správný korrekt, rette korrigieren, richtig διορθώνω, σωστός correcto, corregir oikaista, oikea correct, corriger ispravan, ispraviti correggere, corretto 正しい, 訂正する 바로잡다, 옳은 correct, corrigeren korrekt, rette poprawić, poprawny correto, corrigir исправлять, правильный rätta, riktig แก้ไขให้ถูกต้อง, ถูกต้อง doğru, düzeltmek đúng, sửa chữa 正确的, 纠正

correct

a. correcto-a, exacto-a;
v. corregir, enmendar.

correct

adj correcto; vt corregir
References in classic literature ?
My father, who taught me, is away, and I don't get on very fast alone, for I've no one to correct my pronunciation.
But they were not in the locality remembered by Professor Bumper as being correct.
The description of this picturesque and remarkable little cataract, as given by the scout, is sufficiently correct, though the application of the water to uses of civilized life has materially injured its beauties.
I mean," he said hastily, "that you have the same opportunity to direct the lives of these young men into more regular, disciplined channels that I have to regulate and correct their foolish waste of industry and material here.
It is a heavy annoyance to a writer, who endeavors to represent nature, its various attitudes and circumstances, in a reasonably correct outline and true coloring, that so much of the mean and ludicrous should be hopelessly mixed up with the purest pathos which life anywhere supplies to him.
But you cannot prove either of these surmises to be correct.
The negro, it must be remembered, is an exotic of the most gorgeous and superb countries of the world, and he has, deep in his heart, a passion for all that is splendid, rich, and fanciful; a passion which, rudely indulged by an untrained taste, draws on them the ridicule of the colder and more correct white race.
The page said, further, that dinner was about ended in the great hall by this time, and that as soon as the sociability and the heavy drinking should begin, Sir Kay would have me in and exhibit me before King Arthur and his illustrious knights seated at the Table Round, and would brag about his exploit in capturing me, and would probably exaggerate the facts a little, but it wouldn't be good form for me to correct him, and not over safe, either; and when I was done being exhibited, then ho for the dungeon; but he, Clarence, would find a way to come and see me every now and then, and cheer me up, and help me get word to my friends.
This is the correct Andalusian dawn now - crisp, fresh, dewy, fragrant, pungent - "
See sketch from my pencil; [Figure 7] it is in the main correct, though I think I have foreshortened one end of it a little too much, perhaps.
Don't you reckon that the people that made the books knows what's the correct thing to do?
He mapped out Luigi's character and disposition, his tastes, aversions, proclivities, ambitions, and eccentricities in a way which sometimes made Luigi wince and the others laugh, but both twins declared that the chart was artistically drawn and was correct.