corrected


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Related to corrected: I stand corrected

cor·rect

 (kə-rĕkt′)
v. cor·rect·ed, cor·rect·ing, cor·rects
v.tr.
1.
a. To make or put right: correct a mistake; correct a misunderstanding.
b. To remove the errors or mistakes from: corrected her previous testimony.
c. To indicate or mark the errors in: correct an exam.
2.
a. To speak to or communicate with (someone) in order to point out a mistake or error.
b. To scold or punish so as to improve or reform.
3. To remedy or counteract (a defect, for example): The new glasses corrected his blurry vision.
4. To adjust so as to meet a required standard or condition: correct the wheel alignment on a car.
v.intr.
1. To make corrections.
2. To make adjustments; compensate: correcting for the effects of air resistance.
adj.
1. Free from error or fault; true or accurate.
2. Conforming to standards; proper: correct behavior.

[Middle English correcten, from Latin corrigere, corrēct- : com-, intensive pref.; see com- + regere, to rule; see reg- in Indo-European roots.]

cor·rect′a·ble, cor·rect′i·ble adj.
cor·rect′ly adv.
cor·rect′ness n.
cor·rec′tor n.
Synonyms: correct, rectify, remedy, redress, revise, amend
These verbs mean to make right what is wrong. Correct refers to eliminating faults, errors, or defects: I corrected the spelling mistakes. The new design corrected the flaws in the earlier version.
Rectify stresses the idea of bringing something into conformity with a standard of what is right: "It is dishonest to claim that we can rectify racial injustice without immediate cost" (Mari J. Matsuda).
Remedy involves removing or counteracting something considered a cause of harm, damage, or discontent: He took courses to remedy his abysmal ignorance.
Redress refers to setting right something considered immoral or unethical and usually involves some kind of recompense: "They said he had done very little to redress the abuses that the army had committed against the civilian population" (Daniel Wilkinson).
Revise suggests change that results from careful reconsideration: The agency revised its safety recommendations in view of the new findings.
Amend implies improvement through alteration or correction: "Whenever [the people] shall grow weary of the existing government, they can exercise their constitutional right of amending it, or their revolutionary right to dismember or overthrow it" (Abraham Lincoln).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.corrected - having something undesirable neutralized; "with glasses her corrected vision was 20:20"
uncorrected - left faulty or wrong; "uncorrected astigmatism"
Translations
References in classic literature ?
It might be that a sluggish bond-servant, or an undutiful child, whom his parents had given over to the civil authority, was to be corrected at the whipping-post.
Gentlemen," --then, without a smile, he corrected himself, saying --
BABE, not baby," corrected Rebecca from the circular.
He argued that if one slave re- fused to be corrected, and escaped with his life, the other slaves would soon copy the example; the re- sult of which would be, the freedom of the slaves, and the enslavement of the whites.
I doubt whether my own sense would have corrected me without it.
Jane, you don't understand these things: children must be corrected for their faults.
Agnes said she was afraid I must have given her an unpromising character; but Dora corrected that directly.
little Giry blurted, as though in spite of herself; but she at once corrected herself, with her hands pressed to her mouth: "No, no
Then if there are any imperfections in the constitutions of states (and that many such exist the diversity of constitutions is alone sufficient to assure us), custom has without doubt materially smoothed their inconveniences, and has even managed to steer altogether clear of, or insensibly corrected a number which sagacity could not have provided against with equal effect; and, in fine, the defects are almost always more tolerable than the change necessary for their removal; in the same manner that highways which wind among mountains, by being much frequented, become gradually so smooth and commodious, that it is much better to follow them than to seek a straighter path by climbing over the tops of rocks and descending to the bottoms of precipices.
Captain Nemo, furnished with a lenticular glass which, by means of a mirror, corrected the refraction, watched the orb sinking below the horizon by degrees, following a lengthened diagonal.
He often corrected, with a few clear words, the thousand conjectures advanced by members of the club as to lost and unheard-of travellers, pointing out the true probabilities, and seeming as if gifted with a sort of second sight, so often did events justify his predictions.
D'Artagnan at first believed that he had to do with some judge examining his papers; but he perceived that the man at the desk wrote, or rather corrected, lines of unequal length, scanning the words on his fingers.