correcting


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cor·rect

 (kə-rĕkt′)
v. cor·rect·ed, cor·rect·ing, cor·rects
v.tr.
1.
a. To make or put right: correct a mistake; correct a misunderstanding.
b. To remove the errors or mistakes from: corrected her previous testimony.
c. To indicate or mark the errors in: correct an exam.
2.
a. To speak to or communicate with (someone) in order to point out a mistake or error.
b. To scold or punish so as to improve or reform.
3. To remedy or counteract (a defect, for example): The new glasses corrected his blurry vision.
4. To adjust so as to meet a required standard or condition: correct the wheel alignment on a car.
v.intr.
1. To make corrections.
2. To make adjustments; compensate: correcting for the effects of air resistance.
adj.
1. Free from error or fault; true or accurate.
2. Conforming to standards; proper: correct behavior.

[Middle English correcten, from Latin corrigere, corrēct- : com-, intensive pref.; see com- + regere, to rule; see reg- in Indo-European roots.]

cor·rect′a·ble, cor·rect′i·ble adj.
cor·rect′ly adv.
cor·rect′ness n.
cor·rec′tor n.
Synonyms: correct, rectify, remedy, redress, revise, amend
These verbs mean to make right what is wrong. Correct refers to eliminating faults, errors, or defects: I corrected the spelling mistakes. The new design corrected the flaws in the earlier version.
Rectify stresses the idea of bringing something into conformity with a standard of what is right: "It is dishonest to claim that we can rectify racial injustice without immediate cost" (Mari J. Matsuda).
Remedy involves removing or counteracting something considered a cause of harm, damage, or discontent: He took courses to remedy his abysmal ignorance.
Redress refers to setting right something considered immoral or unethical and usually involves some kind of recompense: "They said he had done very little to redress the abuses that the army had committed against the civilian population" (Daniel Wilkinson).
Revise suggests change that results from careful reconsideration: The agency revised its safety recommendations in view of the new findings.
Amend implies improvement through alteration or correction: "Whenever [the people] shall grow weary of the existing government, they can exercise their constitutional right of amending it, or their revolutionary right to dismember or overthrow it" (Abraham Lincoln).
References in classic literature ?
IT MAY be contended, perhaps, that instead of OCCASIONAL appeals to the people, which are liable to the objections urged against them, PERIODICAL appeals are the proper and adequate means of PREVENTING AND CORRECTING INFRACTIONS OF THE CONSTITUTION.
He noticed the bad grammar used by his shipmates, and made a point of mentally correcting and reconstructing their crudities of speech.
Your impression can not possibly require correcting by mine.
Correcting anemia can preserve kidney function in many kidney transplant recipients according to a new study in the January 2012 Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.
substantially reduce the cost of correcting the pervasive problem of improperly paying expenses from the plan.
She was prohibited from correcting grammatical errors explicitly but could recasts or request clarification if an error impeded comprehension.
Source Income Subject to Withholding, and not Forms 945, Annual Return of Withheld Federal Income Tax, and 1099, except to the extent that (1) correcting a failure to document U.
Other authors have previously described placement of unilateral and bilateral spreader grafts as a means of correcting the crooked nose deformity.