correctly


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Related to correctly: call for, at least, I'd, swayed, deemed

cor·rect

 (kə-rĕkt′)
v. cor·rect·ed, cor·rect·ing, cor·rects
v.tr.
1.
a. To make or put right: correct a mistake; correct a misunderstanding.
b. To remove the errors or mistakes from: corrected her previous testimony.
c. To indicate or mark the errors in: correct an exam.
2.
a. To speak to or communicate with (someone) in order to point out a mistake or error.
b. To scold or punish so as to improve or reform.
3. To remedy or counteract (a defect, for example): The new glasses corrected his blurry vision.
4. To adjust so as to meet a required standard or condition: correct the wheel alignment on a car.
v.intr.
1. To make corrections.
2. To make adjustments; compensate: correcting for the effects of air resistance.
adj.
1. Free from error or fault; true or accurate.
2. Conforming to standards; proper: correct behavior.

[Middle English correcten, from Latin corrigere, corrēct- : com-, intensive pref.; see com- + regere, to rule; see reg- in Indo-European roots.]

cor·rect′a·ble, cor·rect′i·ble adj.
cor·rect′ly adv.
cor·rect′ness n.
cor·rec′tor n.
Synonyms: correct, rectify, remedy, redress, revise, amend
These verbs mean to make right what is wrong. Correct refers to eliminating faults, errors, or defects: I corrected the spelling mistakes. The new design corrected the flaws in the earlier version.
Rectify stresses the idea of bringing something into conformity with a standard of what is right: "It is dishonest to claim that we can rectify racial injustice without immediate cost" (Mari J. Matsuda).
Remedy involves removing or counteracting something considered a cause of harm, damage, or discontent: He took courses to remedy his abysmal ignorance.
Redress refers to setting right something considered immoral or unethical and usually involves some kind of recompense: "They said he had done very little to redress the abuses that the army had committed against the civilian population" (Daniel Wilkinson).
Revise suggests change that results from careful reconsideration: The agency revised its safety recommendations in view of the new findings.
Amend implies improvement through alteration or correction: "Whenever [the people] shall grow weary of the existing government, they can exercise their constitutional right of amending it, or their revolutionary right to dismember or overthrow it" (Abraham Lincoln).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.correctly - in an accurate manner; "the flower had been correctly depicted by his son"; "he guessed right"
wrong, wrongly, incorrectly - in an inaccurate manner; "he decided to reveal the details only after other sources had reported them incorrectly"; "she guessed wrong"

correctly

adverb rightly, right, perfectly, properly, precisely, accurately, aright Did I pronounce your name correctly?

correctly

adverb
In a fair, sporting manner:
Translations
بِشَكْل صَحِيحبِصورَةِ صَحيحَـه
správně
korrekt
oikeinkorrektisti
ispravno
á réttan hátt
正しく
바르게
pravilno
riktigt
อย่างถูกต้อง
doğru olarakdoğru şekilde
một cách đúng đắn

correctly

[kəˈrektlɪ] ADV
1. (= accurately, in right way) [answer, pronounce, predict] → correctamente
if I remember correctlysi mal no recuerdo
if I understand you correctlysi le he entendido bien
2. (= respectably, decently) [behave, proceed] → correctamente
3. (= appropriately) she refused, quite correctly, to give in to his demandsse negó, con toda la razón, a ceder a sus exigencias
when an accident happens, quite correctly, questions are askedcomo debe ser, cuando ocurre un accidente se hacen indagaciones

correctly

[kəˈrɛktli] adv
[pronounce, spell] → correctement; [answer] → correctement
(= properly) [execute] → correctement
quite correctly, she ... → à fort juste titre, elle ...
(= formally) → dans les règles

correctly

adv
(= accurately)richtig; answer, pronounce alsokorrekt; he had correctly assumed that …er hatte richtigerweise angenommen, dass …; if I remember correctlywenn ich mich recht entsinne
(= in proper way) behave, speak, dresskorrekt

correctly

[kəˈrɛktlɪ] adv (accurately) → correttamente; (properly) → correttamente, in modo adatto

correct

(kəˈrekt) verb
1. to remove faults and errors from. These spectacles will correct his eye defect.
2. (of a teacher etc) to mark errors in. I have fourteen exercise books to correct.
adjective
1. free from faults or errors. This sum is correct.
2. right; not wrong. Did I get the correct idea from what you said?; You are quite correct.
corˈrection (-ʃən) noun
corˈrective (-tiv) adjective
setting right. corrective treatment.
corˈrectly adverb
corˈrectness noun

correctly

بِشَكْل صَحِيح správně korrekt richtig σωστά correctamente oikein correctement ispravno correttamente 正しく 바르게 correct riktig poprawnie corretamente правильно riktigt อย่างถูกต้อง doğru olarak một cách đúng đắn 正确地
References in classic literature ?
To say that a word has a meaning is not to say that those who use the word correctly have ever thought out what the meaning is: the use of the word comes first, and the meaning is to be distilled out of it by observation and analysis.
And you" - to the other - "are correctly described as a jackass.
Or, a non-significant sound, which marks the beginning, end, or division of a sentence; such, however, that it cannot correctly stand by itself at the beginning of a sentence, as
Less technically, but not less correctly, the word "anchored," with its characteristic appearance and resolute sound, ought to be good enough for the newspapers of the greatest maritime country in the world.
Another advantage he possessed was that of correctly judging time and distance.
Emily little knew how correctly that chance guess had hit on the truth!
Further, if one thing is said to be correlative with another, and the terminology used is correct, then, though all irrelevant attributes should be removed, and only that one attribute left in virtue of which it was correctly stated to be correlative with that other, the stated correlation will still exist.
While Benjamin and the lawyer were still poring over the scattered morsels of the letter which had been first discovered, and trying to piece them together again, the chemist had divided the greater part of the fragments specially confided to him into two halves each; and had correctly put together some five or six sentences of the letter on the smooth sheet of cardboard prepared for that purpose.
The fact was that not one of them had guessed correctly at his character.
With bills, as you correctly state, I'm punctuality itself: A man may surely claim his dues: But, when there's money to be lent, A man must be allowed to choose Such times as are convenient
not because their mutual intercourse is not near enough, for even if persons so situated should come to one place, and every one should live in his own house as in his native city, and there should be alliances subsisting between each party to mutually assist and prevent any injury being done to the other, still they would not be admitted to be a city by those who think correctly, if they preserved the same customs when they were together as when they were separate.
A military organization may be quite correctly compared to a cone, of which the base with the largest diameter consists of the rank and file; the next higher and smaller section of the cone consists of the next higher grades of the army, and so on to the apex, the point of which will represent the commander in chief.