corridor


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cor·ri·dor

 (kôr′ĭ-dər, -dôr′, kŏr′-)
n.
1. A narrow hallway, passageway, or gallery, often with rooms or apartments opening onto it.
2.
a. A tract of land designated or used for a specific purpose, as for railroad lines, highways, or pipelines.
b. A route designated for a specific purpose: a hazardous material corridor; a sea corridor for shipping; a flight corridor.
c. A route or tract of land used by migrating animals.
3. A thickly populated strip of land connecting two or more urban areas: people who live in the Boston-Washington corridor.
Idiom:
corridors of power
The places or positions from which people in authority wield power.

[French, from Italian corridore, from correre, to run, from Latin currere; see kers- in Indo-European roots.]

corridor

(ˈkɒrɪˌdɔː)
n
1. (Architecture) a hallway or passage connecting parts of a building
2. (Physical Geography) a strip of land or airspace along the route of a road or river: the M1 corridor.
3. (Physical Geography) a strip of land or airspace that affords access, either from a landlocked country to the sea (such as the Polish corridor, 1919-39, which divided Germany) or from a state to an exclave (such as the Berlin corridor, 1945–90, which passed through the former East Germany)
4. (Railways) a passageway connecting the compartments of a railway coach
5. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) corridors of power the higher echelons of government, the Civil Service, etc, considered as the location of power and influence
6. (Aeronautics) a flight path that affords safe access for intruding aircraft
7. (Astronautics) the path that a spacecraft must follow when re-entering the atmosphere, above which lift is insufficient and below which heating effects are excessive
[C16: from Old French, from Old Italian corridore, literally: place for running, from correre to run, from Latin currere]

cor•ri•dor

(ˈkɔr ɪ dər, -ˌdɔr, ˈkɒr-)

n.
1. a passageway giving access to rooms, apartments, ship cabins, railway compartments, etc.; hallway.
2. a narrow passageway of land, as between an inland country and an outlet to the sea.
3. a densely populated region with major overland and air transportation routes: the Northeast corridor.
4. a restricted path along which an aircraft must travel to avoid hostile action, other air traffic, etc.
[1585–95; < Middle French < Upper Italian corridore=corr(ere) to run (< Latin currere]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.corridor - an enclosed passagewaycorridor - an enclosed passageway; rooms usually open onto it
gallery - a covered corridor (especially one extending along the wall of a building and supported with arches or columns)
hall, hallway - an interior passage or corridor onto which rooms open; "the elevators were at the end of the hall"
passageway - a passage between rooms or between buildings

corridor

noun passage, alley, aisle, hallway, passageway He raced down the corridor towards the exit.
Translations
مـَمَرّمَمْشـى، رَواق، مَمَـر
коридор
chodbakoridor
korridorgang
käytävä
hodnik
gangur
廊下
복도
koridorius
koridors
hodnik
korridorflygkorridor
ทางเดินยาว
hành lang

corridor

[ˈkɒrɪdɔːʳ] Npasillo m, corredor m
the corridors of powerlos pasillos del poder

corridor

[ˈkɒrɪdɔːr] n
(in building)couloir m, corridor m
(= area) the M25 corridor → l'axe de la M25

corridor

nKorridor m; (in building also, in train, bus) → Gang m; in the corridors of poweran den Schalthebeln der Macht

corridor

[ˈkɒrɪdɔːʳ] ncorridoio

corridor

(ˈkoridoː) noun
a passageway, especially one off which rooms open. Go along the corridor and up the stairs.

corridor

مـَمَرّ chodba korridor Korridor διάδρομος corredor, pasillo käytävä couloir hodnik corridoio 廊下 복도 gang korridor korytarz corredor коридор korridor ทางเดินยาว koridor hành lang 走廊
References in classic literature ?
Here the reptile stopped and commenced to go over the poor devil carefully, and as it did so its back turned toward me for an instant, and in that instant I gave two mighty leaps that carried me out of the chamber into the corridor beyond, down which I raced with all the speed I could command.
There was nothing for it now other than to fight; nor did I have any advantage as I sprang, sword in hand, into the corridor before the two therns, for my untimely sneeze had warned them of my presence and they were ready for me.
Eustace speaks: 'My dear fellow, be particularly careful not to make any noise; don't bowl your chair up and down the corridor to-night.
But, after I had followed them from the throne room, through several other apartments, and down a long corridor, I found my further progress barred by a soldier who stood guard before a doorway through which the officer conducted Victory.
Scarce had he passed a certain one of these rigid guardsmen before the fellow awoke to sudden life, bounded across the avenue, entered a narrow opening in the outer wall where he swiftly followed a corridor built within the wall itself until presently he emerged a little distance ahead of Turan, where he assumed the stiff and silent attitude of a soldier upon guard.
But in the corridor there was no sign of the person he was looking for and he came back in despair, and frantically waving his hands addressed Stepan Arkadyevitch, who was smoking serenely.
It was a long corridor and it branched into other corridors and it led her up short flights of steps which mounted to others again.
Thuvia lost no time in leading us toward the corridor which winds back and forth up through the cliffs toward the surface thousands of feet above the level on which we had been.
They walked out of the museum into a long, dark corridor, with the walls painted in two shades of red, and other youths walking along suggested the way to them.
Other bedchambers at the other end of the corridor were also let in every case.
In the corridor outside her prison-room two men had paused in heated argument.
Before they departed with their torches, I saw that I had not been conducted to the farthest extremity of the cavern, for a dark and gloomy corridor led beyond my prison room into the heart of the cliff.