corrigibility


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cor·ri·gi·ble

 (kôr′ĭ-jə-bəl, kŏr′-)
adj.
Capable of being corrected, reformed, or improved.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Medieval Latin corrigibilis, from Latin corrigere, to correct; see correct.]

cor′ri·gi·bil′i·ty n.
cor′ri·gi·bly adv.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Given the dream of predictability and corrigibility of social and political action, was their space in this scientific fantasy for politics or the practice of citizenship at all?
We can acknowledge this corrigibility without endorsing the externalism, for we need not accept the possibility of desiring something unbeknownst to ourselves.
The difference lies in terms of corrigibility (James 1998): the claim is that a speaker would be able to self-correct a mistake (some authors hence terming them slips (Edge 1989), and attribute mistakes to problems of cognitive activation or sheer carelessness.
The power and beauty of science do not rest upon infallibility, which it has not, but on corrigibility, without which it is nothing" (4).
Perceptual states have limited rational corrigibility.
It is individualist, in that it asserts the moral primacy of the person against the claims of any social collectivity: egalitarian, inasmuch as it confers on all men the same moral status and denies the relevance to legal or political order of differences in moral worth among human beings; universalist, affirming the moral unity of the human species and according a secondary importance to specific historic associations and cultural forms; and meliorist in its affirmation of the corrigibility and improvability of all social institutions and political arrangements.