corroborate

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cor·rob·o·rate

 (kə-rŏb′ə-rāt′)
tr.v. cor·rob·o·rat·ed, cor·rob·o·rat·ing, cor·rob·o·rates
To strengthen or support with other evidence; make more certain. See Synonyms at confirm.

[Latin corrōborāre, corrōborāt- : com-, com- + rōborāre, to strengthen (from rōbur, rōbor-, strength; see reudh- in Indo-European roots).]

cor·rob′o·ra′tion n.
cor·rob′o·ra′tive (-ə-rā′tĭv, -ər-ə-tĭv), cor·rob′o·ra·to′ry (-ər-ə-tôr′ē) adj.
cor·rob′o·ra′tor n.

corroborate

vb
(tr) to confirm or support (facts, opinions, etc), esp by providing fresh evidence: the witness corroborated the accused's statement.
adj
1. serving to corroborate a fact, an opinion, etc
2. (of a fact) corroborated
[C16: from Latin corrōborāre to invigorate, from rōborāre to make strong, from rōbur strength, literally: oak]
corˌroboˈration n
corroborative, corˈroboˌratory adj
corˈroboratively adv
corˈroboˌrator n

cor•rob•o•rate

(v. kəˈrɒb əˌreɪt; adj. -ər ɪt)

v. -rat•ed, -rat•ing,
adj. v.t.
1. to make more certain; confirm: He corroborated my account of the accident.
adj.
2. Archaic. confirmed.
[1520–30; < Latin corrōborātus, past participle of corrōborāre to strengthen]
cor•rob`o•ra′tion, n.
cor•rob′o•ra`tive (-əˌreɪ tɪv, -ər ə tɪv) cor•rob′o•ra•to`ry, adj.
cor•rob′o•ra`tive•ly, adv.
cor•rob′o•ra`tor, n.

corroborate


Past participle: corroborated
Gerund: corroborating

Imperative
corroborate
corroborate
Present
I corroborate
you corroborate
he/she/it corroborates
we corroborate
you corroborate
they corroborate
Preterite
I corroborated
you corroborated
he/she/it corroborated
we corroborated
you corroborated
they corroborated
Present Continuous
I am corroborating
you are corroborating
he/she/it is corroborating
we are corroborating
you are corroborating
they are corroborating
Present Perfect
I have corroborated
you have corroborated
he/she/it has corroborated
we have corroborated
you have corroborated
they have corroborated
Past Continuous
I was corroborating
you were corroborating
he/she/it was corroborating
we were corroborating
you were corroborating
they were corroborating
Past Perfect
I had corroborated
you had corroborated
he/she/it had corroborated
we had corroborated
you had corroborated
they had corroborated
Future
I will corroborate
you will corroborate
he/she/it will corroborate
we will corroborate
you will corroborate
they will corroborate
Future Perfect
I will have corroborated
you will have corroborated
he/she/it will have corroborated
we will have corroborated
you will have corroborated
they will have corroborated
Future Continuous
I will be corroborating
you will be corroborating
he/she/it will be corroborating
we will be corroborating
you will be corroborating
they will be corroborating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been corroborating
you have been corroborating
he/she/it has been corroborating
we have been corroborating
you have been corroborating
they have been corroborating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been corroborating
you will have been corroborating
he/she/it will have been corroborating
we will have been corroborating
you will have been corroborating
they will have been corroborating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been corroborating
you had been corroborating
he/she/it had been corroborating
we had been corroborating
you had been corroborating
they had been corroborating
Conditional
I would corroborate
you would corroborate
he/she/it would corroborate
we would corroborate
you would corroborate
they would corroborate
Past Conditional
I would have corroborated
you would have corroborated
he/she/it would have corroborated
we would have corroborated
you would have corroborated
they would have corroborated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.corroborate - establish or strengthen as with new evidence or factscorroborate - establish or strengthen as with new evidence or facts; "his story confirmed my doubts"; "The evidence supports the defendant"
back up, back - establish as valid or genuine; "Can you back up your claims?"
vouch - give supporting evidence; "He vouched his words by his deeds"
verify - confirm the truth of; "Please verify that the doors are closed"; "verify a claim"
shew, show, demonstrate, prove, establish - establish the validity of something, as by an example, explanation or experiment; "The experiment demonstrated the instability of the compound"; "The mathematician showed the validity of the conjecture"
document - support or supply with references; "Can you document your claims?"
validate - prove valid; show or confirm the validity of something
2.corroborate - give evidence forcorroborate - give evidence for      
reassert, confirm - strengthen or make more firm; "The witnesses confirmed the victim's account"
circumstantiate - give circumstantial evidence for
3.corroborate - support with evidence or authority or make more certain or confirmcorroborate - support with evidence or authority or make more certain or confirm; "The stories and claims were born out by the evidence"
correspond, gibe, jibe, match, tally, agree, fit, check - be compatible, similar or consistent; coincide in their characteristics; "The two stories don't agree in many details"; "The handwriting checks with the signature on the check"; "The suspect's fingerprints don't match those on the gun"

corroborate

verb support, establish, confirm, document, sustain, back up, endorse, ratify, validate, bear out, substantiate, authenticate I had access to a wide range of documents which corroborated the story.
contradict, refute, disprove, negate, invalidate, rebut

corroborate

verb
1. To present evidence in support of:
2. To assure the certainty or validity of:
Translations
يُؤيِّد، يُثَبِّت،يُعَزِّز
dosvědčitpotvrdit
bekræftebestyrke
styrkja, staîfesta
patvirtinantis
apstiprināt

corroborate

[kəˈrɒbəreɪt] VTcorroborar, confirmar

corroborate

[kəˈrɒbəreɪt] vt [+ story, allegation] → corroborer; [+ statement] → confirmer

corroborate

vtbestätigen; theory alsobekräftigen, erhärten, untermauern

corroborate

[kəˈrɒbəˌreɪt] vtcorroborare, confermare

corroborate

(kəˈrobəreit) verb
to support or confirm (evidence etc already given). She corroborated her sister's story.
corˌroboˈration noun
corˈroborative (-rətiv) adjective
References in classic literature ?
Methodical, or well arranged, or very well delivered, it could not be expected to be; but it contained, when separated from all the feebleness and tautology of the narration, a substance to sink her spirit especially with the corroborating circumstances, which her own memory brought in favour of Mr.
Heathcliff is my daughter-in-law,' said Heathcliff, corroborating my surmise.
Casson's testimony to the fact that he had seen the stranger; nevertheless, he proffered various corroborating circumstances.
It was a terrible pause; and terrible to every ear were the corroborating sounds of opening doors and passing footsteps.
Corroborating NetRatings November findings, the latest figures from Media Metrix put Petopia.
testimony corroborating various other details of the accused's
The AICPA issued three auditing technical practice aids (TPAs): Consideration of Impact of Losses From Natural Disasters Occurring After Completion of Audit Field Work and Signing of the Auditor's Report But Before Issuance of the Auditor's Report and Related Financial Statements; Audit Considerations When Client Evidence and Corroborating Evidence in Support of the Financial Statements Has Been Destroyed by Fire, Flood, or Natural Disaster and Considerations When Audit Documentation Has Been Destroyed by Fire, Flood, or Natural Disaster.
But Liguori said he wouldn't rush the inquiry, noting that the independent counsel is speaking to corroborating witnesses.
Originally disdained as a hoax by scholars and theologians, The Unknown Life of Jesus has since acquired some credibility as corroborating information surfaced.
Furthermore, the ASB recommended that research be undertaken to explore whether there are more effective means of obtaining corroborating evidence than the confirmation process.
Ironically, as Estrich noted in 1991, the greater willingness of prosecutors to pursue sexual assault cases in which the use of force is minimal and there is little corroborating evidence of injury makes the issue of the woman's credibility much more important, and thus gives the defense a greater incentive for attacks on her character.