corrosion


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

cor·ro·sion

 (kə-rō′zhən)
n.
1.
a. The act or process of corroding.
b. The condition produced by corroding.
2. A substance, such as rust, formed by corroding.

[Middle English corosioun, corrosion of tissue, from Old French corrosion, from Medieval Latin corrōsiō, corrōsiōn-, the act of gnawing, from Latin corrōsus, past participle of corrōdere, to gnaw away; see corrode.]

corrosion

(kəˈrəʊʒən)
n
1. (Chemistry) a process in which a solid, esp a metal, is eaten away and changed by a chemical action, as in the oxidation of iron in the presence of water by an electrolytic process
2. slow deterioration by being eaten or worn away
3. (Chemistry) the condition produced by or the product of corrosion

cor•ro•sion

(kəˈroʊ ʒən)

n.
1. the act or process of corroding; condition of being corroded.
2. a product of corroding, as rust.
[1350–1400; Middle English (< Middle French) < Late Latin corrōsiō act of gnawing = Latin corrōd(ere) (see corrode) + -tiō -tion]
cor•ro′sion•al, adj.

cor·ro·sion

(kə-rō′zhən)
The breaking down or destruction of a material, especially a metal, through chemical reactions. The most common form of corrosion is rusting, which occurs when iron combines with oxygen and water.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.corrosion - a state of deterioration in metals caused by oxidation or chemical action
deterioration, impairment - a symptom of reduced quality or strength
2.corrosion - erosion by chemical action
chemical action, chemical change, chemical process - (chemistry) any process determined by the atomic and molecular composition and structure of the substances involved
pitting, indentation, roughness - the formation of small pits in a surface as a consequence of corrosion
rusting, rust - the formation of reddish-brown ferric oxides on iron by low-temperature oxidation in the presence of water
Translations
تآكُل، تَحات، حتُّ كيماوي
korozerozežíránírozleptávání
ætsningrusttæring
tæring; ryîgun
hrdzavenie
aşın mapaslan ma

corrosion

[kəˈrəʊʒən] Ncorrosión f

corrosion

[kəˈrəʊʒən] n
[metal] → corrosion f
(= deterioration) [life, society] → détérioration f

corrosion

nKorrosion f; (fig)Zerstörung f

corrosion

[kəˈrəʊʒn] ncorrosione f

corrode

(kəˈrəud) verb
to destroy or eat away (as rust, chemicals etc do).
corˈrosion (-ʒən) noun
corˈrosive (-siv) adjective
tending to corrode.

cor·ro·sion

n. corrosión, desgaste por elementos químicos.
References in classic literature ?
For it is plain, that every word we speak is, in some degree, a diminution of our lunge by corrosion, and, consequently, contributes to the shortening of our lives.
And so, what with sleet, and corrosion, and the cost of roof-repairing, and the lack of room for more wires, the telephone men were between the devil and the deep sea--between the urgent necessity of burying their wires, and the inexorable fact that they did not know how to do it.
Many of them were very old, and as time keepers valueless; the works having suffered, more or less, from corrosion - but all were richly jewelled and in cases of great worth.
Say at once that he lies; in his mouth truth itself turns to corrosion.
Two thousand summers have imparted to the monuments of Grecian literature, as to her marbles, only a maturer golden and autumnal tint, for they have carried their own serene and celestial atmosphere into all lands to protect them against the corrosion of time.
Corrosion behavior of metallic biomaterials has a strong effect on the biodegradability of medical metallic implants.
In this regard, corrosion management will facilitate the manufacturing sector to enhance its competitive edge in the global market he added.
Power generation was the largest end-use industry for corrosion inhibitors, with market demand of 1,366.
However, DSS can still be susceptible to internal and external corrosion threats in both surface and buried environments.
Growth of the water treatment market is expected to boost demand for corrosion inhibitors.
The corrosion of metals in CCA treated-wood was studied by several researchers who found that it was more corrosive than untreated wood and suggested that at a minimum, hot-dip galvanized fasteners should be used in treated wood.