cosmogony

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cos·mog·o·ny

 (kŏz-mŏg′ə-nē)
n. pl. cos·mog·o·nies
1.
a. The astrophysical study of the origin and evolution of the universe.
b. A specific theory or model of the origin and evolution of the universe.
2. A philosophical, religious, or mythical explanation of the origin of the universe.

cos′mo·gon′ic (-mə-gŏn′ĭk), cos′mo·gon′i·cal adj.
cos′mo·gon′i·cal·ly adv.
cos·mog′o·nist n.

cosmogony

(kɒzˈmɒɡənɪ)
n, pl -nies
1. (Philosophy) the study of the origin and development of the universe or of a particular system in the universe, such as the solar system
2. (Philosophy) a theory of such an origin or evolution
[C17: from Greek kosmogonia, from cosmo- + gonos creation]
cosˈmogonal adj
cosmogonic, ˌcosmoˈgonical adj
cosˈmogonist n

cos•mog•o•ny

(kɒzˈmɒg ə ni)

n., pl. -nies.
a theory or story of the origin and development of the universe, a solar system, etc.
[1860–65; < Greek kosmogonía creation of the world. See cosmo-, -gony]
cos`mo•gon′ic (-məˈgɒn ɪk) adj.
cos•mog′o•nist, n.

cosmogony

1. a theory about the origin and the evolution of the universe.
2. the branch of astrophysics that studies the origin and evolution of specific astronomical systems and the universe as a whole.
3. cosmology. — cosmogonist, n. — cosmogonic, adj.
See also: Cosmology

cosmogony

The study of the origin and development of the universe.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cosmogony - the branch of astrophysics that studies the origin and evolution and structure of the universe
big bang theory, big-bang theory - (cosmology) the theory that the universe originated sometime between 10 billion and 20 billion years ago from the cataclysmic explosion of a small volume of matter at extremely high density and temperature
nebular hypothesis - (cosmology) the theory that the solar system evolved from a hot gaseous nebula
planetesimal hypothesis - (cosmology) the theory that the solar system was formed by the gravitational accumulation of planetesimals
continuous creation theory, steady state theory - (cosmology) the theory that the universe maintains a constant average density with matter created to fill the void left by galaxies that are receding from each other; "the steady state theory has been abandoned in favor of the big bang theory"
astrophysics - the branch of astronomy concerned with the physical and chemical properties of celestial bodies
big bang - (cosmology) the cosmic explosion that is hypothesized to have marked the origin of the universe
inflation - (cosmology) a brief exponential expansion of the universe (faster than the speed of light) postulated to have occurred shortly after the big bang
closed universe - (cosmology) a universe that is spatially closed and in which there is sufficient matter to halt the expansion that began with the big bang; the visible matter is only 10 percent of the matter required for closure but there may be large amounts of dark matter
cosmic string, string - (cosmology) a hypothetical one-dimensional subatomic particle having a concentration of energy and the dynamic properties of a flexible loop
CBR, CMB, CMBR, cosmic background radiation, cosmic microwave background, cosmic microwave background radiation - (cosmology) the cooled remnant of the hot big bang that fills the entire universe and can be observed today with an average temperature of about 2.725 kelvin
Hubble constant, Hubble parameter, Hubble's constant, Hubble's parameter - (cosmology) the ratio of the speed of recession of a galaxy (due to the expansion of the universe) to its distance from the observer; the Hubble constant is not actually a constant, but is regarded as measuring the expansion rate today
ylem - (cosmology) the original matter that (according to the big bang theory) existed before the formation of the chemical elements
dark matter - (cosmology) a hypothetical form of matter that is believed to make up 90 percent of the universe; it is invisible (does not absorb or emit light) and does not collide with atomic particles but exerts gravitational force
Translations

cosmogony

[kɒzˈmɒgənɪ] Ncosmogonía f

cosmogony

nKosmogonie f
References in periodicals archive ?
Many of these elemental words are found in the various cosmogonies that have informed cultural ideologies around the world.
On aurait accorde trop d'importance aux ontologies (la place de l'humain dans les autres mondes du vivant), aux cosmogonies, mythologies, visions du monde, bref a une culture concue en dehors de l'existence.
Moving away from reiterations of Duchamp's display of a urinal without realizing that it has lost all its subversive charge, Wayne Lewis presents bursts of a thought that invests in and broadcasts engagements with various fields: migration, transnationalism, cosmogonies and their metamorphosing into "Globalectics".
In discussing Alejo Carpentier's work, Frydman agonizes over the appropriation, sensationalization, exoticization, and essentialization of African diaspora struggles and cosmogonies to create a white-Caribbean creole's combative repudiation of Euro-Cuban cultural and literary imperialism that emphasized a whiteness as the normative.
10) A fully-fledged doctrine of creatio ex nihilo is first encountered with Irenaeus of Lyons, who developed it to counter two Hellenic cosmogonies that were popular in his time, namely that uncreated matter forms the substance of the creative process, and that creation comes to be through a process of emanations from the Divinity.
Kelly Richardson enveloppe le spectateur de cosmogonies du vertige.
Artaud wants to create a theater for "la foule" -- the crowd, the mob, the masses -- in opposition to tired, insipid old codgers and he appeals to ancient religions: "These gods or heroes, these monsters, these natural and cosmic forces will be interpreted according to images from the most ancient sacred texts and old cosmogonies.
Artaud wants to create a theater for "la foule" - the crowd, the mob, the masses - in opposition to tired, insipid old codgers and he appeals to ancient religions: "These gods or heroes, these monsters, these natural and cosmic forces will be interpreted according to images from the most ancient sacred texts and old cosmogonies.
The motif of primordial water is universal since it appears in almost all cosmogonies, symbolizing, as Mircea Eliade noticed, "the primordial substance, from which every form is born and in which everything comes back, through regression or cataclysm.
As contrasted with the Hesiodic and the somewhat later Orphic cosmogonies and theologies that developed on the Greek mainland princip[al]ly[,] it was preeminently social in its motive.
Carolina Lopez-Ruiz, When the Gods Were Born: Greek cosmogonies and the Near-East, Harvard, University Press, 2010.
Berard traces Fiammetta's garden in the Filocolo back to its origins among the paradisiacal gardens of the ancient cosmogonies and the Roman hortus conclusus, describing Boccaccio's shift from the encyclopedic didacticism of earlier medieval gardens to the autonomous awareness of classical civilization that characterizes humanism.