cosmogony


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Related to cosmogony: Kabbalist

cos·mog·o·ny

 (kŏz-mŏg′ə-nē)
n. pl. cos·mog·o·nies
1.
a. The astrophysical study of the origin and evolution of the universe.
b. A specific theory or model of the origin and evolution of the universe.
2. A philosophical, religious, or mythical explanation of the origin of the universe.

cos′mo·gon′ic (-mə-gŏn′ĭk), cos′mo·gon′i·cal adj.
cos′mo·gon′i·cal·ly adv.
cos·mog′o·nist n.

cosmogony

(kɒzˈmɒɡənɪ)
n, pl -nies
1. (Philosophy) the study of the origin and development of the universe or of a particular system in the universe, such as the solar system
2. (Philosophy) a theory of such an origin or evolution
[C17: from Greek kosmogonia, from cosmo- + gonos creation]
cosˈmogonal adj
cosmogonic, ˌcosmoˈgonical adj
cosˈmogonist n

cos•mog•o•ny

(kɒzˈmɒg ə ni)

n., pl. -nies.
a theory or story of the origin and development of the universe, a solar system, etc.
[1860–65; < Greek kosmogonía creation of the world. See cosmo-, -gony]
cos`mo•gon′ic (-məˈgɒn ɪk) adj.
cos•mog′o•nist, n.

cosmogony

1. a theory about the origin and the evolution of the universe.
2. the branch of astrophysics that studies the origin and evolution of specific astronomical systems and the universe as a whole.
3. cosmology. — cosmogonist, n. — cosmogonic, adj.
See also: Cosmology

cosmogony

The study of the origin and development of the universe.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cosmogony - the branch of astrophysics that studies the origin and evolution and structure of the universe
big bang theory, big-bang theory - (cosmology) the theory that the universe originated sometime between 10 billion and 20 billion years ago from the cataclysmic explosion of a small volume of matter at extremely high density and temperature
nebular hypothesis - (cosmology) the theory that the solar system evolved from a hot gaseous nebula
planetesimal hypothesis - (cosmology) the theory that the solar system was formed by the gravitational accumulation of planetesimals
continuous creation theory, steady state theory - (cosmology) the theory that the universe maintains a constant average density with matter created to fill the void left by galaxies that are receding from each other; "the steady state theory has been abandoned in favor of the big bang theory"
astrophysics - the branch of astronomy concerned with the physical and chemical properties of celestial bodies
big bang - (cosmology) the cosmic explosion that is hypothesized to have marked the origin of the universe
inflation - (cosmology) a brief exponential expansion of the universe (faster than the speed of light) postulated to have occurred shortly after the big bang
closed universe - (cosmology) a universe that is spatially closed and in which there is sufficient matter to halt the expansion that began with the big bang; the visible matter is only 10 percent of the matter required for closure but there may be large amounts of dark matter
cosmic string, string - (cosmology) a hypothetical one-dimensional subatomic particle having a concentration of energy and the dynamic properties of a flexible loop
CBR, CMB, CMBR, cosmic background radiation, cosmic microwave background, cosmic microwave background radiation - (cosmology) the cooled remnant of the hot big bang that fills the entire universe and can be observed today with an average temperature of about 2.725 kelvin
Hubble constant, Hubble parameter, Hubble's constant, Hubble's parameter - (cosmology) the ratio of the speed of recession of a galaxy (due to the expansion of the universe) to its distance from the observer; the Hubble constant is not actually a constant, but is regarded as measuring the expansion rate today
ylem - (cosmology) the original matter that (according to the big bang theory) existed before the formation of the chemical elements
dark matter - (cosmology) a hypothetical form of matter that is believed to make up 90 percent of the universe; it is invisible (does not absorb or emit light) and does not collide with atomic particles but exerts gravitational force
Translations

cosmogony

[kɒzˈmɒgənɪ] Ncosmogonía f

cosmogony

nKosmogonie f
References in classic literature ?
I knew that you could not say to yourself'stereotomy' without being brought to think of atomies, and thus of the theories of Epicurus; and since, when we discussed this subject not very long ago, I mentioned to you how singularly, yet with how little notice, the vague guesses of that noble Greek had met with confirmation in the late nebular cosmogony, I felt that you could not avoid casting your eyes upward to the great nebula in Orion, and I certainly expected that you would do so.
All the value which attaches to Pythagoras, Paracelsus, Cornelius Agrippa, Cardan, Kepler, Swedenborg, Schelling, Oken, or any other who introduces questionable facts into his cosmogony, as angels, devils, magic, astrology, palmistry, mesmerism, and so on, is the certificate we have of departure from routine, and that here is a new witness.
The swelling biceps, the coat straining at its buttons over the chest, the air of conscious conviction of the supereminence of the male in the cosmogony of creation, even a calm display of bow legs as subduing and enchanting agents in the gentle tourneys of Cupid--these were the approved arms and ammunition of the Clover Leaf gallants.
As a philosopher, however, Nietzsche does not stand or fall by his objections to the Darwinian or Spencerian cosmogony.
He rightly insists that among ancient Near Eastern cosmogony accounts only Enuma elish features theomachy and that H.
a new neutral synthesis of ubiquitous doctrines such as substantivalism and occasionalism, as well as absolutism and relativism, for cosmology and cosmogony.
the first plastic expressions vouchsafed by a mechanical cosmogony.
The final section addresses the ritual practice of time in connection with sociology, politics, eschatology, and cosmogony, among other perspectives.
The cosmology of a fixed hierarchy of heavens, earth, and hells traversed through multiple lifetimes, and the cosmogony, whereby this same hierarchy collapses and remerges in never-ending cycles, is well known and we need not belabor it here.
Allusions to a cosmogony contained in a Vedic hymn (RV 10.
The priesthood of the temple of the sun created the Heliopolitan cosmogony (a narration of the creation of the world) where the god Atum played the role of the creator.
One such cosmogony that can inspire us in our times is the Ashur myth from the Munda tribe in Central India.