cosmography

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cos·mog·ra·phy

 (kŏz-mŏg′rə-fē)
n. pl. cos·mog·ra·phies
1. The mapping of the universe as a whole system.
2. A general description or depiction of the world or universe: "a full-blown cosmography in which Earth is 'the garbage dump of the universe'" (Mark Muro).

cos·mog′ra·pher n.
cos′mo·graph′ic (-mə-grăf′ĭk), cos′mo·graph′i·cal adj.
cos′mo·graph′i·cal·ly adv.

cosmography

(kɒzˈmɒɡrəfɪ)
n
1. (Physical Geography) a representation of the world or the universe
2. (Philosophy) the science dealing with the whole order of nature
cosˈmographer, cosˈmographist n
cosmographic, ˌcosmoˈgraphical adj
ˌcosmoˈgraphically adv

cos•mog•ra•phy

(kɒzˈmɒg rə fi)

n., pl. -phies.
1. the study of the structure of the universe and its constituent parts, comprising astronomy, geography, and geology.
2. a description or representation of the main features of the universe.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Greek kosmographía description of the world. See cosmo-, -graphy]
cos•mog′ra•pher, cos•mog′ra•phist, n.
cos`mo•graph′ic (-məˈgræf ɪk) cos`mo•graph′i•cal, adj.
cos`mo•graph′i•cal•ly, adv.

cosmography

1. the branch of astronomy that maps and describes the main features of the universe.
2. a description or representation of the main features of the universe. — cosmographer, n. — cosmographic, cosmographical, adj.
See also: Cosmology
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cosmography - the science that maps the general features of the universe; describes both heaven and earth (but without encroaching on geography or astronomy)
natural science - the sciences involved in the study of the physical world and its phenomena
2.cosmography - a representation of the earth or the heavens; "the cosmography of Ptolemy"
representation - a creation that is a visual or tangible rendering of someone or something
Translations

cosmography

[kɒzˈmɒgrəfɪ] Ncosmografía f

cosmography

nKosmografie f

cosmography

[kɒzˈmɒgrəfɪ] ncosmografia
References in classic literature ?
Or again," said he, "the author may show himself to be an astronomer, or a skilled cosmographer, or musician, or one versed in affairs of state, and sometimes he will have a chance of coming forward as a magician if he likes.
This book is a history of the life and accomplishments of Franciscan Friar Vincenzo Coronelli, one of the most famous cosmographers and creator of globes and maps in the seventeenth century.
Boas concluded that, although they are in opposite camps, physicists and cosmographers aspire after the same thing: "to find the eternal truth.
One institutional point of this conflict is found in the efforts of the academy of cosmographers at Seville to train the sailors and pilots who actually went to sea in the new, mathematically-based discipline (Padron, Spacious 46-51).
Indian cosmographers, Manosi Lahiri explains, tended towards artistic rather than realistic representation; their 'maps' were based on religious concepts and creation myths, and bore little relation to physical geography.
Protocols leading to a uniform system of observation and collection, an ability to study, analyze, and ensure continuity--in short, specific social and institutional conditions--became necessary to shape the way naturalists, botanists, cosmographers, and ecclesiastics in the field looked at the world.
For this purpose, he hired prominent cosmographers Alonso de Santa Cruz (c.
to the late obseruations of Cosmographers in oure age) are exactlye
Almeida tells an altogether different story of Portuguese cosmography, in which a productive dialog between cosmographers (such as Pedro Nunes) and pilots, theory and practice, established a culture of conjecture and refutation that helped improve cartography and instrument making.
Alongside the study of coins and inscriptions and the reading of Greek and Roman cosmographers, Morales's methodological discourse advised his readers to consult the legends of the saints and the oral testimony of local peasants.
Cosmographers and Pilots of the Spanish Maritime Empire.
astronomers, astrologers, and cosmographers, of Western antiquity to the Renanissance, the "reality" of the heavens was, if nothing else, assumed to consist in the celestial spheres.