cosmography

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Related to cosmographical: cosmography

cos·mog·ra·phy

 (kŏz-mŏg′rə-fē)
n. pl. cos·mog·ra·phies
1. The mapping of the universe as a whole system.
2. A general description or depiction of the world or universe: "a full-blown cosmography in which Earth is 'the garbage dump of the universe'" (Mark Muro).

cos·mog′ra·pher n.
cos′mo·graph′ic (-mə-grăf′ĭk), cos′mo·graph′i·cal adj.
cos′mo·graph′i·cal·ly adv.

cosmography

(kɒzˈmɒɡrəfɪ)
n
1. (Physical Geography) a representation of the world or the universe
2. (Philosophy) the science dealing with the whole order of nature
cosˈmographer, cosˈmographist n
cosmographic, ˌcosmoˈgraphical adj
ˌcosmoˈgraphically adv

cos•mog•ra•phy

(kɒzˈmɒg rə fi)

n., pl. -phies.
1. the study of the structure of the universe and its constituent parts, comprising astronomy, geography, and geology.
2. a description or representation of the main features of the universe.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Greek kosmographía description of the world. See cosmo-, -graphy]
cos•mog′ra•pher, cos•mog′ra•phist, n.
cos`mo•graph′ic (-məˈgræf ɪk) cos`mo•graph′i•cal, adj.
cos`mo•graph′i•cal•ly, adv.

cosmography

1. the branch of astronomy that maps and describes the main features of the universe.
2. a description or representation of the main features of the universe. — cosmographer, n. — cosmographic, cosmographical, adj.
See also: Cosmology
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cosmography - the science that maps the general features of the universe; describes both heaven and earth (but without encroaching on geography or astronomy)
natural science - the sciences involved in the study of the physical world and its phenomena
2.cosmography - a representation of the earth or the heavens; "the cosmography of Ptolemy"
representation - a creation that is a visual or tangible rendering of someone or something
Translations

cosmography

[kɒzˈmɒgrəfɪ] Ncosmografía f

cosmography

nKosmografie f

cosmography

[kɒzˈmɒgrəfɪ] ncosmografia
References in periodicals archive ?
Andrew Eliason then argues that Java la Grande was a reality rather than just a cosmographical construct to Guillaume Le Testu.
The cosmographical model with two celestial bodies explains why utopia can shift so easily from the positive to the negative, from eu-topia to dys-topia.
Hell, existence in the definitive rejection of "being for," is not a cosmographical destination but a dimension of human nature, the abyss into which it reaches at its lower end.
Suwar al-aqalim, the same title as al-Balkht's earlier work) claiming a connection to Alexander, Mario Casari deals with the cosmographical aspects of the Persian Alexander tradition, rightly emphasizing the importance that the pseudo-Aristotelian De Mundo has had in this context.
Atlas Armillary, which illustrates geographical, astronomical, and cosmographical concepts of the Renaissance, could be a choice for students and history lovers.
the fully elaborated model in the cosmographical excursus of a symmetrical, wholly interconnected, fully navigable, single-oikoumene globe contradicts the alternative cosmological vision .
In puranic cosmographical accounts, Mount Meru is described as the centre of the world, with a central tree growing on its summit, either a jambu tree or the heavenly parijata tree.
For Padron, Don Quijote and Sancho's ride into the heavens on Clavileno is "a satire of Spanish imperialista," a "piece of parodic buckshot" that encompasses many targets, including the "panoptic ambitions of panegyrical [epic] literature cast in a cosmographical register" (Spacious 1-3).
In the Clavileno episode, therefore, Cervantes does not just mock the fanciful extravagance of romance: he takes aim at the panoptic ambitions of panegyrical literature cast in a cosmographical register.
These are followed by interpretative essays on the mechanics and means of mapping in early modern Europe: globes, charts, cosmographical assumptions, the representation of heavenly bodies and their use, how maps influenced forms of writing, and religious thought.
Catherine Harding, "Opening to God: The cosmographical diagrams of Opicinus de Canistris," Zeitschrift Fur Kunstgeschichte 61:1 (1998): 24; Michael Camille, "The Image and the Self," Framing Medieval Bodies (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1994), 94.