cosmography

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cos·mog·ra·phy

 (kŏz-mŏg′rə-fē)
n. pl. cos·mog·ra·phies
1. The mapping of the universe as a whole system.
2. A general description or depiction of the world or universe: "a full-blown cosmography in which Earth is 'the garbage dump of the universe'" (Mark Muro).

cos·mog′ra·pher n.
cos′mo·graph′ic (-mə-grăf′ĭk), cos′mo·graph′i·cal adj.
cos′mo·graph′i·cal·ly adv.

cosmography

(kɒzˈmɒɡrəfɪ)
n
1. (Physical Geography) a representation of the world or the universe
2. (Philosophy) the science dealing with the whole order of nature
cosˈmographer, cosˈmographist n
cosmographic, ˌcosmoˈgraphical adj
ˌcosmoˈgraphically adv

cos•mog•ra•phy

(kɒzˈmɒg rə fi)

n., pl. -phies.
1. the study of the structure of the universe and its constituent parts, comprising astronomy, geography, and geology.
2. a description or representation of the main features of the universe.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Greek kosmographía description of the world. See cosmo-, -graphy]
cos•mog′ra•pher, cos•mog′ra•phist, n.
cos`mo•graph′ic (-məˈgræf ɪk) cos`mo•graph′i•cal, adj.
cos`mo•graph′i•cal•ly, adv.

cosmography

1. the branch of astronomy that maps and describes the main features of the universe.
2. a description or representation of the main features of the universe. — cosmographer, n. — cosmographic, cosmographical, adj.
See also: Cosmology
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cosmography - the science that maps the general features of the universe; describes both heaven and earth (but without encroaching on geography or astronomy)
natural science - the sciences involved in the study of the physical world and its phenomena
2.cosmography - a representation of the earth or the heavens; "the cosmography of Ptolemy"
representation - a creation that is a visual or tangible rendering of someone or something
Translations

cosmography

[kɒzˈmɒgrəfɪ] Ncosmografía f

cosmography

nKosmografie f

cosmography

[kɒzˈmɒgrəfɪ] ncosmografia
References in periodicals archive ?
This is an illuminating book: Renaissance geographies, cosmographies, offer the historian unusually translucent windows into the ways in which fifteenth- and sixteenth-century people understood and interacted with their worlds, and Roberts is a subtle guide through that of Berlinghieri.
The theme of fascination and the desire to gain knowledge and understanding of the Ottoman Empire and its inhabitants continues in the final chapters as European text and imagery is explored in popular printed costume books and encyclopaedic images as seen in genealogies, histories, and cosmographies.
One feature that the epistle shares with other medieval encyclopaedias and especially with later cosmographies is that they examine the wonders of the animal realm with emphasis on the purposeful nature of creation: each species follows the form and has the faculties that suit it best.
Certainly, Pardo's interest in layered effects can be seen in some of his earlier projects, which belie any suspicion that his use of them at LACMA was primarily inspired by pre-Columbian cosmographies.
Second, the survival of mirabilia in cosmographies and in world maps attests to a rich and deeply rooted spatial imagination.
Manual knowledge refers to historical materials--folk handbooks, cosmographies, chronicles, manifestos, and so on--that have encoded moral, ethical, and practical information.
The fourth chapter offers Francis Bacon's argument for a new empirical and pragmatic history and Abraham Ortelius' representations of both modern and pilgrimage cosmographies.