cosmography


Also found in: Thesaurus, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

cos·mog·ra·phy

 (kŏz-mŏg′rə-fē)
n. pl. cos·mog·ra·phies
1. The mapping of the universe as a whole system.
2. A general description or depiction of the world or universe: "a full-blown cosmography in which Earth is 'the garbage dump of the universe'" (Mark Muro).

cos·mog′ra·pher n.
cos′mo·graph′ic (-mə-grăf′ĭk), cos′mo·graph′i·cal adj.
cos′mo·graph′i·cal·ly adv.

cosmography

(kɒzˈmɒɡrəfɪ)
n
1. (Physical Geography) a representation of the world or the universe
2. (Philosophy) the science dealing with the whole order of nature
cosˈmographer, cosˈmographist n
cosmographic, ˌcosmoˈgraphical adj
ˌcosmoˈgraphically adv

cos•mog•ra•phy

(kɒzˈmɒg rə fi)

n., pl. -phies.
1. the study of the structure of the universe and its constituent parts, comprising astronomy, geography, and geology.
2. a description or representation of the main features of the universe.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Greek kosmographía description of the world. See cosmo-, -graphy]
cos•mog′ra•pher, cos•mog′ra•phist, n.
cos`mo•graph′ic (-məˈgræf ɪk) cos`mo•graph′i•cal, adj.
cos`mo•graph′i•cal•ly, adv.

cosmography

1. the branch of astronomy that maps and describes the main features of the universe.
2. a description or representation of the main features of the universe. — cosmographer, n. — cosmographic, cosmographical, adj.
See also: Cosmology
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cosmography - the science that maps the general features of the universe; describes both heaven and earth (but without encroaching on geography or astronomy)
natural science - the sciences involved in the study of the physical world and its phenomena
2.cosmography - a representation of the earth or the heavens; "the cosmography of Ptolemy"
representation - a creation that is a visual or tangible rendering of someone or something
Translations

cosmography

[kɒzˈmɒgrəfɪ] Ncosmografía f

cosmography

nKosmografie f

cosmography

[kɒzˈmɒgrəfɪ] ncosmografia
References in classic literature ?
From the time the law of Copernicus was discovered and proved, the mere recognition of the fact that it was not the sun but the earth that moves sufficed to destroy the whole cosmography of the ancients.
Orthography, etymology, syntax, and prosody, biography, astronomy, geography, and general cosmography, the sciences of compound proportion, algebra, land-surveying and levelling, vocal music, and drawing from models, were all at the ends of his ten chilled fingers.
It would have been hard to find a man better fitted for the job; the son of a Portuguese adventurer and a Macassan princess, he was educated by the Jesuits in Goa, who identified in him a talent for cosmography.
Native American cosmography consists of six directions: east, south, west, north, above, and below.
His interest covered almost all scientific fields of the time: philosophy, theology, physics, chemistry, medicine, anthropology, zoology, botany, mineralogy, geology, astronomy, meteorology, mathematics, mechanics, climatology, cosmology, cosmography, architecture etc, without neglecting various practical skills such as weaving, sailing, husbandry, etc.
Relevant to the preceding imagery, Blake in another context in Jerusalem (80:36, E 237), transforming topography into cosmography, sees "A Dragon form on Zion Hill's most ancient promontory," allegorically the sun and moon as State Religion, solar Dragon and lunar Whore copulating in the heavens, spheres incongruously signifying a moralizing Selfhood.
navigator needed to know science-wise and then learn that Christopher Columbus knew Latin, Portuguese, Castilian, Cosmography, Geography, Algebra, Geometry, Cartography, Theology, Navigation, plus secret ciphers,” says Rosa, “question how could he have been the touted wool-weaver from Genoa and not a noble well-schooled from a young age?
Comprehending" means representing cosmography in miniature, as well as understanding.
Mysticism, cosmography, symbolism, analogy, and other intellectual habits of mind of medieval thinking intersect in Opicinus's works with the idiosyncratic aesthetic of a trained medieval artist prone to visionary fugues.
The Cosmography of Aethicus Ister; edition, translation, and commentary.
The meaning 'sky, heaven, bowl of heaven' is also attested for Greek [delta][epsilon][pi][alpha][zeta]; in "a single locus of solar mythology and cosmography in Greek poetry of the eighth, seventh, sixth, and early fifth centuries," reviewed by Calvert Watkins in a magisterial study of the "New Sappho" (Watkins 2007, not cited by Yakubovich).
Ultimately, it is this tendency to view the world and its inhabitants as signs of the Creator that facilitated the assimilation into a Christian cosmography of much of the geographical lore about monstrous races frequently associated with the most distant regions of the world in classical authorities like Pliny the Elder.