cosmological argument


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Related to cosmological argument: Ontological argument, Teleological argument

cosmological argument

n
(Philosophy) philosophy one of the arguments that purport to prove the existence of God from empirical facts about the universe, esp the argument to the existence of a first cause. Compare ontological argument1, teleological argument
References in periodicals archive ?
First of all, in my cosmological argument, let's call [A.
7-134) commences with the kalam cosmological argument for God based on the temporal production of the world, and thereby its need for a creator.
The cosmological argument is one of the three philosophical arguments used by philosophers and theologians to rationally prove or demonstrate God's existence.
It is informative, however, to compare those passages to an argument from Letter from a Gentleman in which Hume qualifies his critique of the cosmological argument by reminding that he has left the ontological argument untouched.
Thomas Aquinas' cosmological argument for the existence of God.
The religious vision of the biblical world, he argues, has been fundamental in opening the physical universe to a healthy scientific study; biblical monotheism can ground a strong cosmological argument capable of counteracting theories of radical scientific materialism that threaten to destroy any real sense of purpose.
Normally confident, I would stammer out my thoughts on the cosmological argument for the existence of God.
Neusner mentions Hume, but Hume's nod to a weak basis for a God in natural religion and his destruction of the usual arguments from design would destroy Neusner's praise of Reason - and his clear use of the Cosmological Argument - in a New York minute.
On a practical level, the philosophy of religion has always felt the need to use the cosmological argument in tandem with the design argument to gain efficiency, because the first establishes the existence of a first cause of the universe, while the second demonstrates its nature.
The second chapter as a propaedeutic to Van Riel's cosmological argument investigates how the moral purification of the gods takes place throughout Plato's theology by emphasizing the goodness of the gods as the safeguard for order in the universe, "The order of the world is the expression of a goodness that sets forth in the moral conduct of gods and human beings.
Because no logical contradiction occurs in saying that a conditionally necessary God does not exist, Overman believes this understanding of necessity allows him to sidestep traditional Humean and Kantian criticisms of the cosmological argument.
The cosmological argument in Chapter 4 is an attempt to show that, as regards the presence of contingent beings, theism has more explanatory power than naturalism.