cosmological constant


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cosmological constant

n.
A constant introduced into the general theory of relativity, proportional to the energy density of the vacuum, and related to the rate of expansion or contraction of the universe. The vacuum energy represented by the cosmological constant is a form of dark energy.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cosmological constant - an arbitrary constant in the equations of general relativity theory
constant - a number representing a quantity assumed to have a fixed value in a specified mathematical context; "the velocity of light is a constant"
Translations
kosmologinen vakio
References in periodicals archive ?
The simplest resolution is to put the cosmological constant back into Einstein's equation.
But it looks like the favorite theory is one that has long been sidelined - that of the cosmological constant, introduced by Albert Einstein (who else?
where [XI]/2 is the variation of cosmological constant [LAMBDA].
We also discuss the cosmological constant in these spacetimes.
Einstein, in order to obtain static universe, had earlier introduced the term with the cosmological constant.
Possibly, Jason, when he needlessly added a cosmological constant to his theory of relativity to account for a quasi-static distribution of matter as required by the velocity of stars, unaware that the universe was in fact expanding.
The simplest form of DE compatible with the data, a cosmological constant, has a value incompatible with our understanding of Quantum Field Theory.
In the ACDM model, the role of DE is played by the cosmological constant A (vacuum energy), but this model has two main problems: the fine tuning problem and the coincidence problem [7].
So Einstein altered his equation, adding a factor called the cosmological constant, representing a constant energy density in space that kept the universe static.
Adding to gravity and repulsion the cosmological constant (repulsion) on a "gravitational field equation" of space-time warpage, Einstein built another mechanical worldview.
Developed by Cai and Zhang [25], these represent static, plane-symmetric solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell equations with a negative cosmological constant.
Chapter 5, "The Goldilocks Enigma" (a phrase used by Paul Davies in connection with the "just right for life" character of the universe), sets out twelve examples of the apparent fine-tuning of the universe, including the ratio of the electromagnetic and strong interaction strengths, the value of the cosmological constant, and the dimensionality of space.