cosmology


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Related to cosmology: String theory, Quantum cosmology

cos·mol·o·gy

 (kŏz-mŏl′ə-jē)
n. pl. cos·mol·o·gies
1. The study of the physical universe considered as a totality of phenomena in time and space.
2.
a. The astrophysical study of the history, structure, and constituent dynamics of the universe.
b. A specific theory or model of this structure and these dynamics.
3. A philosophical, religious, or mythical explanation of the nature and structure of the universe.

cos′mo·log′ic (-mə-lŏj′ĭk), cos′mo·log′i·cal adj.
cos′mo·log′i·cal·ly adv.
cos·mol′o·gist n.

cosmology

(kɒzˈmɒlədʒɪ)
n
1. (Philosophy) the philosophical study of the origin and nature of the universe
2. (Astronomy) the branch of astronomy concerned with the evolution and structure of the universe
3. (Philosophy) a particular account of the origin or structure of the universe: Ptolemaic cosmology.
4. (Astronomy) a particular account of the origin or structure of the universe: Ptolemaic cosmology.
cosmological, ˌcosmoˈlogic adj
ˌcosmoˈlogically adv
cosˈmologist n

cos•mol•o•gy

(kɒzˈmɒl ə dʒi)

n.
1. the branch of philosophy dealing with the origin and general structure of the universe, esp. with such of its characteristics as space, time, causality, and freedom.
2. the branch of astronomy that deals with the general structure and evolution of the universe.
[1650–60; < New Latin cosmologia. See cosmo-, -logy]
cos•mol′o•gist, n.
cos`mo•log′i•cal (-məˈlɒdʒ ɪ kəl) cos`mo•log′ic, adj.
cos`mo•log′i•cal•ly, adv.

cos·mol·o·gy

(kŏz-mŏl′ə-jē)
The branch of astronomy that deals with the origin, evolution, and structure of the universe.

cosmology

- The study of the world as a totality of all phenomena in space and time.
See also related terms for phenomena.

Cosmology

See also astronomy; planets; sun.

a 19th-century theory about cosmic evolution, developed from contemporary science, that regards the cosmos as self-existent and self-acting. — cosmist, n.
1. a theory about the origin and the evolution of the universe.
2. the branch of astrophysics that studies the origin and evolution of specific astronomical systems and the universe as a whole.
3. cosmology. — cosmogonist, n. — cosmogonic, adj.
1. the branch of astronomy that maps and describes the main features of the universe.
2. a description or representation of the main features of the universe. — cosmographer, n. — cosmographic, cosmographical, adj.
1. the branch of astronomy that studies the overall structure of the physical universe.
2. the branch of philosophy that studies the origin, structure, and evolution of the universe, especially such characteristics as space, time, causality, and freedom. — cosmologic, cosmological, adj. — cosmologist, n.
the concept that the universe and God are identical; pantheism. — cosmotheist, n.
the concept of the cosmos as alive.
the belief concerning the creation by a transcendant God of the universe, matter, and living organisms out of nothing. — creationist, n.
1. the concept that the earth is the center of the universe.
2. Astronomy. the measurements or observations that are relative to the center of the earth. — geocentric, adj.
1. the concept that the sun is the center of the universe.
2. Astronomy. the measurements or observations that are relative to the center of the sun. Also heliocentricity.heliocentric, adj.
the theory that the totality of existence comprises only the physical universe in time and space. — pancosmic, adj.
a Gnostic theory that considered Satan’s to be the controlling will of the universe.
the philosophical theory of Herbert Spencer that cosmic evolution is cyclic, controlled by mechanical forces which tend toward equilibrium and relative complexity until a peak is reached, after which dissolution occurs, the universe reverts to a simple state, and the cycle begins again. — Spencerian, n., adj.
the belief that purpose and design control the development of the universe and are apparent through natural phenomena. — teleologist, n. — teleology, n.
the science of the universe. — universologist, n.

cosmology

1. The study of the origin, nature, structure, or evolution of the universe.
2. The study of the universe.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cosmology - the metaphysical study of the origin and nature of the universe
metaphysics - the philosophical study of being and knowing
2.cosmology - the branch of astrophysics that studies the origin and evolution and structure of the universe
big bang theory, big-bang theory - (cosmology) the theory that the universe originated sometime between 10 billion and 20 billion years ago from the cataclysmic explosion of a small volume of matter at extremely high density and temperature
nebular hypothesis - (cosmology) the theory that the solar system evolved from a hot gaseous nebula
planetesimal hypothesis - (cosmology) the theory that the solar system was formed by the gravitational accumulation of planetesimals
continuous creation theory, steady state theory - (cosmology) the theory that the universe maintains a constant average density with matter created to fill the void left by galaxies that are receding from each other; "the steady state theory has been abandoned in favor of the big bang theory"
astrophysics - the branch of astronomy concerned with the physical and chemical properties of celestial bodies
big bang - (cosmology) the cosmic explosion that is hypothesized to have marked the origin of the universe
inflation - (cosmology) a brief exponential expansion of the universe (faster than the speed of light) postulated to have occurred shortly after the big bang
closed universe - (cosmology) a universe that is spatially closed and in which there is sufficient matter to halt the expansion that began with the big bang; the visible matter is only 10 percent of the matter required for closure but there may be large amounts of dark matter
cosmic string, string - (cosmology) a hypothetical one-dimensional subatomic particle having a concentration of energy and the dynamic properties of a flexible loop
CBR, CMB, CMBR, cosmic background radiation, cosmic microwave background, cosmic microwave background radiation - (cosmology) the cooled remnant of the hot big bang that fills the entire universe and can be observed today with an average temperature of about 2.725 kelvin
Hubble constant, Hubble parameter, Hubble's constant, Hubble's parameter - (cosmology) the ratio of the speed of recession of a galaxy (due to the expansion of the universe) to its distance from the observer; the Hubble constant is not actually a constant, but is regarded as measuring the expansion rate today
ylem - (cosmology) the original matter that (according to the big bang theory) existed before the formation of the chemical elements
dark matter - (cosmology) a hypothetical form of matter that is believed to make up 90 percent of the universe; it is invisible (does not absorb or emit light) and does not collide with atomic particles but exerts gravitational force
Translations
kosmologie
kosmologia
kozmologija
kosmologi
kozmológia
kozmologija
kosmologi

cosmology

[kɒzˈmɒlədʒɪ] Ncosmología f

cosmology

[kɒzˈmɒlədʒi] n
(= theory) → cosmologie f
(= study) → cosmologie f

cosmology

nKosmologie f

cosmology

[kɒzˈmɒlədʒɪ] ncosmologia
References in classic literature ?
Everything I see in him corresponds to his pamphlet on Biblical Cosmology.
4) Earth, in the cosmology of Hesiod, is a disk surrounded by the river Oceanus and floating upon a waste of waters.
Topics range from Eastern and indigenous religious traditions to philosophy of history, cosmology, and epistemology.
Third, a fundamental theory of quantum gravity will provide a new picture of the beginning of space and time at the Big Bang; one possibility is that the Big Bang singularity in classical cosmology could be replaced by a phase transition from a pre-geometric quantum phase to a geometric classical phase.
Simulation is a promising and powerful tool for the field of cosmology.
What is new is a modern approach which considers it as a scientific hypothesis with different supportive models stemming from cosmology and other physics approaches.
The purposes of the Cosmology Section of the Astronomical Society of Southern Africa are:
This book is essentially a history of cosmology that spans the earliest efforts of the ancient Greeks through to Copernicus and Galileo, Einstein's theory of relativity, quantum theory and finally modern times.
They are Sebastiano Cantalupo - Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of California, Santa Cruz, the Astronomy and Astrophysics Department, Martin Haehnelt - Professor of Cosmology and Astrophysics, Institute of Astronomy and the Kavli Institute for Cosmology, University of Cambridge and Simon Lilly - Professor of Observational Cosmology, Institute for Astronomy at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, Switzerland.
The Ethics of Cosmology: Natural Right and the Rediscovery of Design deserves ongoing recommendation as a powerful survey connecting new scientific cosmology with new ethical views of the universe, and is a pick for any college-level collection strong in astronomy or philosophy.
Professor Carlos Frenk, director of Durham's internationally-renowned Institute for Computational Cosmology, was one of four scientists to share in the 2011 Cosmology Prize of The Peter and Patricia Gruber Foundation.