cosmopolitism


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cos·mop·o·lite

 (kŏz-mŏp′ə-līt′)
n.
1. A cosmopolitan person: a true cosmopolite—a Renaissance man.
2. Ecology An organism found in most parts of the world.

[Greek kosmopolītēs : kosmos, world + polītēs, citizen (from polis, city; see pelə- in Indo-European roots).]

cos·mop′o·lit′ism (-lī-tĭz′əm, -lĭ-tĭz′-) n.
References in periodicals archive ?
Her research complements avenues of scholarship into black cosmopolitism and the use of ocean routes and Anglophone language as contact zones.
The Many Faces of Cosmo-Polis: Border Thinking and Critical Cosmopolitism," Public Culture 12.
It thus offers an alternative to the cosmopolitism of Tel Aviv and the religious aura of Jerusalem.
Ilie (2011: 112-113) considers that the intercultural competence consists of: types of knowledge: about the culture of one's own country and that of other countries; knowledge about the interaction within the society between people of different cultures at different levels; types of capacities: capacity to interpret a document or an event that is specific to a culture; capacity to gain new knowledge from another culture as well as to understand new cultural practices; capacity to use the knowledge in certain situations; capacity to adjust; capacity to solve conflicts generated by the misinterpretation of facts or events; relational capacity; capacity to negotiate;attitudes: openness, curiosity, empathy, availability, cosmopolitism, flexibility.
Hameiri found himself throughout his life identified and identifying with Jewish and Zionist ideology, as well as Hungarian nationalism alongside a form of Central European cosmopolitism, and this dual identity is clearly reflected in his war literature.
Onwards, with the exception of Fenet's article (2004), specialists do not stop to explore the meanings and arcanes of the New Cyneas; they include the name of the author in their lists of proponents of international peace and order (Bowden 2011: 2; Call 2007: 13-14), pioneers of cosmopolitism (Tannsjo 2006: 288), ancestors of global governance (Weiss 2009: 259), etc.
This dimension considers content regarding patriotism, nationalism, and attitudes toward students' own countries as well as elements from the curricula that promote multiculturalism, cosmopolitism, and the concept of supranational identity.
The Islamic traditions fulfill this need and guide the mankind to cosmopolitism societal styles of life as mentioned in Surah Al-Furqan verses no.
The challenge is how to construct, or reconstruct, the internationalism of workers and peoples confronted by the cosmopolitism of oligarchic capital.
To the contrary, Walter Benjamin attempts to teach Germans a cosmopolitism they increasingly turn away from in hostility.
And the actor in 'padded waistcoat and brown corduroys' (II, 16) is just another version of Dunn's tweeded dominie-poet in 'Remembering Lunch': both are intellectuals who choose the 'solitude of toying with the earth' (II, 17) over urbane, go-getting cosmopolitism.