costs


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Related to costs: fixed costs, Overhead Costs, Legal costs

cost

 (kôst)
n.
1. An amount paid or required in payment for a purchase; a price.
2. The expenditure of something, such as time or labor, necessary for the attainment of a goal: "Freedom to advocate unpopular causes does not require that such advocacy be without cost" (Milton Friedman).
3. costs Law Charges incurred in bringing litigation, including court fees and charges that may be payable by the losing party, but usually not including attorneys' fees.
v. cost, cost·ing, costs
v.intr.
To require a specified payment, expenditure, effort, or loss: It costs more to live in the city.
v.tr.
1. To have as a price.
2. To cause to lose, suffer, or sacrifice: Participating in the strike cost me my job.
3. past tense and past participle costed To estimate or determine the cost of: The accountants costed out our expenses.
Idiom:
at all costs
Regardless of the expense or effort involved; by any means.

[Middle English, from Old French, from coster, to cost, from Latin cōnstāre, to be fixed, cost; see constant.]

cost′less adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.costs - pecuniary reimbursement to the winning party for the expenses of litigation
reimbursement - compensation paid (to someone) for damages or losses or money already spent etc.; "he received reimbursement for his travel expenses"
Translations
مَصاريف الدَّعوى
soudní náklady
sagsomkostning
málskostnaîur
súdne výdavky
dava/yargılama masraflarımahkeme harcı

cost

(kost) past tense past participle cost verb
1. to be obtainable at a certain price. This jacket costs 75 dollars; The victory cost two thousand lives.
2. (past tense, past participle ˈcosted) to estimate the cost of (a future project). The caterer costed the reception at three hundred dollars.
noun
the price to be paid (for something). What is the cost of this coat?
ˈcostly adjective
costing much. a costly wedding-dress.
ˈcostliness noun
costs noun plural
the expenses of a legal case. He won his case and was awarded costs of $500.
at all costs
no matter what the cost or outcome may be. We must prevent disaster at all costs.
References in classic literature ?
If it was cheap ugliness, I'd say nothing, but it costs as much as the other, and I don't get any satisfaction out of it.
The play costs the performers too much, and the audience is too cold-hearted.
That all this might not be too onerous on the purses of his rustic patrons, who are apt to considered the costs of schooling a grievous burden, and schoolmasters as mere drones he had various ways of rendering himself both useful and agreeable.
It costs me less in every sense to incur the penalty of disobedience to the State than it would to obey.
It costs trouble, and work, and sometimes money; but it pays in the end.
When his touring in Switzerland is finished, he does not throw that broomstick away, but lugs it home with him, to the far corners of the earth, although this costs him more trouble and bother than a baby or a courier could.
Steamboat captains is always rich, and get sixty dollars a month, and THEY don't care a cent what a thing costs, you know, long as they want it.
There are wealthy gentlemen in England who drive four-horse passenger- coaches twenty or thirty miles on a daily line, in the summer, because the privilege costs them considerable money; but if they were offered wages for the service, that would turn it into work and then they would resign.
What it costs me to write of her in these terms, I must leave you to imagine.
If a client were slow to settle his bill of costs, Mr.
As I was saying, Pip, it were my intentions to have had it cut over him; but poetry costs money, cut it how you will, small or large, and it were not done.
The manufactured cotton is more valuable than the raw cotton, because the manufacture costs wear and tear of machinery, wear and tear of the factory, rent of the ground upon which the factory is built, and human labor, or wear and tear of live men, which has to be made good by food, shelter, and rest.