cottony


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cot·ton·y

 (kŏt′n-ē)
adj.
1. Of or resembling cotton; fluffy.
2. Covered with fibers resembling cotton; nappy.

cot•ton•y

(ˈkɒt n i)

adj.
1. of or like cotton; soft.
2. covered with a down or nap resembling cotton.
[1570–80]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.cottony - resembling cotton; as soft as cotton
soft - yielding readily to pressure or weight
Translations
References in classic literature ?
With the Johnsons I am afraid I lost many opportunities; the tone was gray and cottony, I might almost say woolly.
Washington, Oct 16 (ANI): A recent clinical trial on a few diabetics has shown that a cottony glass material could help to speed the healing of wounds.
There are cottony patches of clouds reminiscent of the cumulus clouds in the sky over Miami, where the artist lives.
Thirty years ago, at a time when cottony white instant-yeast loaves dominated the bread scene, baker Steve Sullivan led the West Coast artisanal bread revolution, powered by sourdough.
Washington, May 5 (ANI): Missouri University researchers have developed a revolutionary cottony glass material to take on hard-to-heal open wounds.
Lycopersicon Whitish-pink Colonies are esculentum mycelial growth whitish-pick with a purple tinge mycelium extensive and cottony in culture Fruit sample Microscopic examination Organism Carica papaya Conidial heads are Aspergillius flavus radiate, later splitting into several loose columns.
see in those cottony blobs the painter has coaxed to the tips of
I'm so thirsty, whatever I say to John sounds cottony.
Nevertheless, like the watercolor-paper portraits, the subjects he has chosen to render as tapestries--from the thick, cottony lightness of his dark, imploding storm clouds, as different from Ruscha's text/cloud as his faces are from Close's physiognomies, to the monumental heaviness of his two tragic rhinoceroses, their penned-up primordiality inextricable from their confined physical weight--garner their affect and their significance from the patently tactile stuff of which they are made.
The first begins in March and April when the over-wintering adults lay 50 to 300 eggs in a cottony mass on young twigs.