cotyledon


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cotyledon
bean seed germinating

cot·y·le·don

 (kŏt′l-ēd′n)
n.
1. Botany A leaf of the embryo of a seed plant, which upon germination either remains in the seed or emerges, enlarges, and becomes green. Also called seed leaf.
2. Anatomy One of the lobules constituting the uterine side of the mammalian placenta, consisting mainly of a rounded mass of villi.

[Latin cotylēdōn, navelwort, from Greek kotulēdōn, from kotulē, hollow object.]

cot′y·le′don·ar′y (-ēd′n-ĕr′ē), cot′y·le′don·al (-ēd′n-əl), cot′y·le′do·nous (-ēd′n-əs) adj.

cotyledon

(ˌkɒtɪˈliːdən)
n
1. (Botany) a simple embryonic leaf in seed-bearing plants, which, in some species, forms the first green leaf after germination
2. (Zoology) a tuft of villi on the mammalian placenta
[C16: from Latin: a plant, navelwort, from Greek kotulēdōn, from kotulē cup, hollow]
ˌcotyˈledonal adj
ˌcotyˈledonary adj
ˌcotyˈledonous, ˌcotyˈledoˌnoid adj

cot•y•le•don

(ˌkɒt lˈid n)

n.
the primary or rudimentary leaf of the embryo of seed plants.
[1535–45; < Latin: navelwort < Greek kotylēdṓn literally, a cuplike hollow, derivative of kotýlē cup]
cot`y•le′don•al, cot`y•le′don•ar`y (-ˌɛr i) cot`y•le′don•ous, adj.

cot·y·le·don

(kŏt′l-ēd′n)
A leaf of the embryo of a seed-bearing plant. Most cotyledons emerge, enlarge, and become green after the seed has germinated. Cotyledons either store food for the growing embryo or absorb food that has been stored in the endosperm for eventual distribution to the growing parts of the embryo. Also called seed leaf. See more at dicotyledon, monocotyledon.

cotyledon

A seed leaf that provides food for an embryo plant.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cotyledon - embryonic leaf in seed-bearing plantscotyledon - embryonic leaf in seed-bearing plants
cataphyll - a reduced or scarcely developed leaf at the start of a plant's life (i.e., cotyledons) or in the early stages of leaf development
Translations

cotyledon

[ˌkɒtɪˈliːdən] Ncotiledón m

cotyledon

nKeimblatt nt

cotyledon

[ˌkɒtɪˈliːdn] n (Bot) → cotiledone m
References in classic literature ?
These historians resemble a botanist who, having noticed that some plants grow from seeds producing two cotyledons, should insist that all that grows does so by sprouting into two leaves, and that the palm, the mushroom, and even the oak, which blossom into full growth and no longer resemble two leaves, are deviations from the theory.
It can be shown that plants most widely different in habit and general appearance, and having strongly marked differences in every part of the flower, even in the pollen, in the fruit, and in the cotyledons, can be crossed.
Survival of Coleogyne seedlings was significantly reduced by partial or total cotyledon removal, demonstrating that seeds reserves were stored in cotyledons before and several weeks after germination.
Influence of temperature and water uptake on the expression of cotyledon necrosis in soybean [Glycine max (L.
In Norway spruce it enhanced the induction of embryogenic tissues (Kvaalen, 1994), whereas in Pinus radiata, it promoted shoot bud differentiation in cotyledon explants (Kumar et al.
The process produces a concentrated fiber product as well as a cotyledon fraction rich in protein and saponins.
The wide-ranging coverage in this volume spans from two important groups of gynosperms, the Cycads (palm ferns) and the Pines, to monocotyledons (which have sprouting seeds with a single cotyledon or primary leaf) represented by genera significant in terms of phylogeny, agriculture, and horticulture.
The specific activity per 1 mg enzyme extract increased steadily along with the increase in the cotyledon mass during the first week, reached the maximum on day eight, and then began to drop (Fig.
collagen 2 4 TO 11883 cowpea cotyledon 2 4 TO 11238 oil palm endocarp 1 2 GX 29106 charcoal Unit Depth (cm) Date (uncal.
Stage 2, some burning of the emerging leaves and a thin sliver of bruised tissue along the windward side of the cotyledon.
The cellular ultrastructure of the cell wall and cotyledon tissue has been shown to be significantly different between normal and hard beans.
Some top plants for alpine-style containers include: Semper vivums or houseleeks, Draba aizoides, Saxifraga cotyledon, Rhodohypoxis baurii, miniature dianthus and oxalis, Phlox douglasii, gentians, Primula farinosa, small forms of Androsace and Thymus.