count noun


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Related to count noun: mass noun, common noun

countable noun

Countable nouns (also known as count nouns) are nouns that can be considered as individual, separable items, which means that we are able to count them with numbers—we can have one, two, five, 15, 100, and so on. We can also use them with the indefinite articles a and an (which signify a single person or thing) or with the plural form of the noun.
Countable nouns contrast with uncountable nouns (also known as non-count or mass nouns), which cannot be separated and counted as individual units or elements. Uncountable nouns cannot take an indefinite article, nor can they be made plural.
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count noun

n.
A common noun, such as frog, bicycle, or concept, that can form a plural or occur with an indefinite article, with numerals, or with such terms as many. It is often contrasted with mass noun. See Usage Note at collective noun.

count noun

n
1. (Grammar) linguistics logic a noun that can be qualified by the indefinite article, and may be used in the plural, as telephone and thing but not airs and graces or bravery. Compare mass noun, sortal
2. (Logic) linguistics logic a noun that can be qualified by the indefinite article, and may be used in the plural, as telephone and thing but not airs and graces or bravery. Compare mass noun, sortal

count′ noun`


n.
a noun, as apple, table, or birthday, that typically refers to a countable thing and that in English can be used in both the singular and the plural and can be preceded by the indefinite article a or an and by numerals. Compare mass noun.
[1950–55]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.count noun - a noun that forms plurals
noun - a content word that can be used to refer to a person, place, thing, quality, or action
Translations
nom dénombrable
telbaar substantieftelbaar zelfstandig naamwoord
substantivo contável
References in periodicals archive ?
Three properties generally characterize the determinative category (D): (a) D cannot combine with the or a or with each other; (b) D can combine with a singular count noun to form a grammatical noun phrase (NP); (c) D can occur as a head in the partitive construction (i.
Moreover, '"mind", though a count noun, does not signify a kind of thing, let alone a substance, in any sense' (41).
Linguistically, we distinguish between thing terms and stuff terms, where, roughly, "thing" is a count noun, and "stuff" is a mass noun.
The first case is made clear in the phrase, "the million and one living things in the air around us is invisible," where the count noun "million and one living things" is treated as a mass noun (thus, "is" is used instead of "are") (90).
signals a count noun that is not usually pluralized in a particular sense (an ear for music; the promise of peace) or that "submodifier" labels an adverb that modifies an adjective or another adverb (as shown at too but--oddly--not at very).
There exist things, and there exists stuff, where roughly, "thing" is a count noun, and "stuff' is a mass noun.
In a compound with a singular count noun as head, such as dog catcher, English requires a determiner to form a noun phrase.
A close examination of B36, supported by the comparative evidence of some other early theories of the soul, suggests that the word psuche could function as both a mass term and a count noun for Heraclitus.
Given this lexical entry, the phonological string [star] can only correspond to a singular count noun in the syntax and to an object in the semantics/conceptual structure.
Moreover, colloquially, at least, and given the appropriate circumstances, almost any count noun can be given an appropriate collective interpretation if quantified with less.
However, ten informants clustered in the north of England apparently consider broth a count noun as they answered with them.
However, whenever a mass noun is "recategorized" (Corbett 2000: 81) to a count noun.