countability


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count·a·ble

 (koun′tə-bəl)
adj.
1. Capable of being counted: countable items; countable sins.
2. Mathematics Capable of being put into a one-to-one correspondence with the positive integers.

count′a·bil′i·ty n.
count′a·bly adv.

countability

(ˌkaʊntəˈbɪlɪtɪ)
n
1. (Grammar) grammar the fact of being countable
2. (Mathematics) maths denumerability
Translations
spočetnost
References in periodicals archive ?
The PN space under the strong topology is a Hausdorff space and satisfies the first countability axiom.
Although the above recommendation requires allowing more flexibility for funds received, paradoxically, there may currently not be enough ac countability to ESL students for the funding that they generate.
Throughout the article X will denotes the topological Hausdroff group, written additively, which satisfies the first axiom of countability.
But as a delegate I am very aware of the countability I have to represent members' views, rather than just my own and I need to discuss this widely with others.
Appendices are included on Mathspeak, countability, and decadic notation.
The dimensional quantity reflecting the recurrence of an event is called countability (or just "count").
Expanded countability for excused absences: The current limit of 10 days (or 80 hours), with no more than two days absent in any month is overly restrictive and does not reflect typical workplace policies.
In an experiment derived by Biersack involving randomly distributed potatoes, the difference in their countability is whether the 'counter is able to perceive relationship' between them (1982:824).
The first seven chapters cover the usual topics of point-set or general topology, including topological spaces, new spaces from old ones, connectedness, the separation and countability axioms, and metrizability and paracompactness, as well as special topics such as contraction mapping in metric spaces, normed linear spaces, the Frechet derivative, manifolds, fractals, compactifications, the Alexander subbase, and the Tychonoff theorems.