countenance

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coun·te·nance

 (koun′tə-nəns)
n.
1. Appearance, especially the expression of the face: The question left him with a puzzled countenance.
2. The face or facial features.
3.
a. A look or expression indicative of encouragement or of moral support.
b. Support or approval.
4. Obsolete Bearing; demeanor.
tr.v. coun·te·nanced, coun·te·nanc·ing, coun·te·nanc·es
To give sanction or support to; tolerate or approve: The college administration will not countenance cheating.

[Middle English contenaunce, from Old French, from contenir, to behave; see contain.]

coun′te·nanc·er n.

countenance

(ˈkaʊntɪnəns)
n
1. the face, esp when considered as expressing a person's character or mood: a pleasant countenance.
2. support or encouragement; sanction
3. composure; self-control (esp in the phrases keep or lose one's countenance; out of countenance)
vb (tr)
4. to support or encourage; sanction
5. to tolerate; endure
[C13: from Old French contenance mien, behaviour, from Latin continentia restraint, control; see contain]
ˈcountenancer n

coun•te•nance

(ˈkaʊn tn əns)

n., v. -nanced, -nanc•ing. n.
1. appearance, esp. the expression of the face: a sad countenance.
2. the face; visage.
3. calm facial expression; composure.
4. approval or favor.
5. Obs. bearing; behavior.
v.t.
6. to permit or tolerate.
7. to approve or encourage.
[1250–1300; Middle English cuntenaunce behavior, bearing, self-control < Anglo-French cuntena(u)nce, Old French contenance < Latin continentia continence]
coun′te•nanc`er, n.
syn: See face.

countenance


Past participle: countenanced
Gerund: countenancing

Imperative
countenance
countenance
Present
I countenance
you countenance
he/she/it countenances
we countenance
you countenance
they countenance
Preterite
I countenanced
you countenanced
he/she/it countenanced
we countenanced
you countenanced
they countenanced
Present Continuous
I am countenancing
you are countenancing
he/she/it is countenancing
we are countenancing
you are countenancing
they are countenancing
Present Perfect
I have countenanced
you have countenanced
he/she/it has countenanced
we have countenanced
you have countenanced
they have countenanced
Past Continuous
I was countenancing
you were countenancing
he/she/it was countenancing
we were countenancing
you were countenancing
they were countenancing
Past Perfect
I had countenanced
you had countenanced
he/she/it had countenanced
we had countenanced
you had countenanced
they had countenanced
Future
I will countenance
you will countenance
he/she/it will countenance
we will countenance
you will countenance
they will countenance
Future Perfect
I will have countenanced
you will have countenanced
he/she/it will have countenanced
we will have countenanced
you will have countenanced
they will have countenanced
Future Continuous
I will be countenancing
you will be countenancing
he/she/it will be countenancing
we will be countenancing
you will be countenancing
they will be countenancing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been countenancing
you have been countenancing
he/she/it has been countenancing
we have been countenancing
you have been countenancing
they have been countenancing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been countenancing
you will have been countenancing
he/she/it will have been countenancing
we will have been countenancing
you will have been countenancing
they will have been countenancing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been countenancing
you had been countenancing
he/she/it had been countenancing
we had been countenancing
you had been countenancing
they had been countenancing
Conditional
I would countenance
you would countenance
he/she/it would countenance
we would countenance
you would countenance
they would countenance
Past Conditional
I would have countenanced
you would have countenanced
he/she/it would have countenanced
we would have countenanced
you would have countenanced
they would have countenanced
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.countenance - the appearance conveyed by a person's facecountenance - the appearance conveyed by a person's face; "a pleasant countenance"; "a stern visage"
appearance, visual aspect - outward or visible aspect of a person or thing
expression, look, face, facial expression, aspect - the feelings expressed on a person's face; "a sad expression"; "a look of triumph"; "an angry face"
poker face - a face without any interpretable expression (as that of a good poker player)
2.countenance - formal and explicit approval; "a Democrat usually gets the union's endorsement"
commendation, approval - a message expressing a favorable opinion; "words of approval seldom passed his lips"
O.K., okay, okeh, okey, OK - an endorsement; "they gave us the O.K. to go ahead"
visa - an endorsement made in a passport that allows the bearer to enter the country issuing it
nihil obstat - the phrase used by the official censor of the Roman Catholic Church to say that a publication has been examined and contains nothing offensive to the church
3.countenance - the human face (`kisser' and `smiler' and `mug' are informal terms for `face' and `phiz' is British)countenance - the human face (`kisser' and `smiler' and `mug' are informal terms for `face' and `phiz' is British)
human head - the head of a human being
face, human face - the front of the human head from the forehead to the chin and ear to ear; "he washed his face"; "I wish I had seen the look on his face when he got the news"
pudding face, pudding-face - a large fat human face
colloquialism - a colloquial expression; characteristic of spoken or written communication that seeks to imitate informal speech
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
Verb1.countenance - consent to, give permissioncountenance - consent to, give permission; "She permitted her son to visit her estranged husband"; "I won't let the police search her basement"; "I cannot allow you to see your exam"
brook, endure, tolerate, stomach, abide, bear, digest, stick out, suffer, put up, stand, support - put up with something or somebody unpleasant; "I cannot bear his constant criticism"; "The new secretary had to endure a lot of unprofessional remarks"; "he learned to tolerate the heat"; "She stuck out two years in a miserable marriage"
furlough - grant a leave to; "The prisoner was furloughed for the weekend to visit her children"
give - allow to have or take; "I give you two minutes to respond"
consent, go for, accept - give an affirmative reply to; respond favorably to; "I cannot accept your invitation"; "I go for this resolution"
permit, tolerate, allow - allow the presence of or allow (an activity) without opposing or prohibiting; "We don't allow dogs here"; "Children are not permitted beyond this point"; "We cannot tolerate smoking in the hospital"
authorize, authorise, clear, pass - grant authorization or clearance for; "Clear the manuscript for publication"; "The rock star never authorized this slanderous biography"
grant, allow - let have; "grant permission"; "Mandela was allowed few visitors in prison"
let in, admit, include - allow participation in or the right to be part of; permit to exercise the rights, functions, and responsibilities of; "admit someone to the profession"; "She was admitted to the New Jersey Bar"
privilege, favour, favor - bestow a privilege upon
trust - allow without fear
allow in, intromit, let in, admit - allow to enter; grant entry to; "We cannot admit non-members into our club building"; "This pipe admits air"

countenance

verb
1. tolerate, sanction, endorse, condone, support, encourage, approve, endure, brook, stand for (informal), hack (slang), put up with (informal) He would not countenance his daughter marrying while she was still a student.
noun
1. (Literary) face, features, expression, look, appearance, aspect, visage, mien, physiognomy He met each inquiry with an impassive countenance.
2. support, assistance, backing, aid, favour, sanction, approval, endorsement Those who remained could hope for no countenance or advancement.
3. composure, cool (slang), dignity, poise, coolness, aplomb, calmness, equanimity, self-assurance, sang-froid, self-possession, imperturbability I kept my countenance and remained self-possessed.

countenance

noun
1. An outward appearance:
2. A disposition of the facial features that conveys meaning, feeling, or mood:
3. The front surface of the head:
face, feature (often used in plural), muzzle, visage.
Informal: mug.
Slang: kisser, map, pan, puss.
verb
1. To lend supportive approval to:
encourage, favor, smile on (or upon).
2. To be favorably disposed toward:
Informal: go for.
Translations
مَلامِح وجْـهيُشجِّـع، يُأيِّـد
schvalovattrpětvýraz
ansigtansigtsudtrykbilligeminetolerere
andlitláta viîgangast
veidasveido išraiška
atbalstītizskatssejaveicināt
desteklemekteşvik etmekyüz

countenance

[ˈkaʊntɪnəns] (frm)
A. N
1. (liter) (= face) → semblante m, rostro m
to keep one's countenancecontener la risa, no perder la serenidad
to lose countenancedesconcertarse
to be out of countenanceestar desconcertado
to put sb out of countenancedesconcertar a algn
2. (frm) (no pl) (= approval) → consentimiento m
to give or lend countenance to [+ news] → acreditar
B. VT (frm) (= permit) to countenance sthconsentir or permitir algo
to countenance sb doing sthpermitir a algn que haga algo

countenance

[ˈkaʊntɪnəns]
n (= face) → visage m
vt (= allow) → approuver

countenance

n
(old, form: = face) → Angesicht nt (old, Eccl), → Antlitz nt (old); (= expression)Gesichtsausdruck m; to keep one’s countenance (fig)die Fassung or Haltung bewahren; to lose countenance (fig)das Gesicht verlieren; to put somebody out of countenancejdn aus der Fassung bringen
(= support) to give/lend countenance to somethingetw ermutigen/unterstützen
vt behaviourgutheißen; plan, suggestion also, personunterstützen

countenance

[ˈkaʊntɪnəns] (frm)
1. n (face) → (espressione f del) volto
to keep one's countenance → restare impassibile
2. vt (permit) to countenance sth/sb doing sthammettere qc/che qn faccia qc

countenance

(ˈkauntinəns) noun
(expression on) the face.
verb
to encourage, support or accept. We can't possibly countenance the spending of so much money.
References in classic literature ?
During the foregoing address the progress of the speaker was too plainly read by those most interested in his success through the medium of the countenances of the men he addressed.
The expression of his eye, however, changed as it glanced across the different countenances of his supporters and of his opponents.
Some hours passed thus, while they, by their countenances, expressed joy, the cause of which I did not comprehend.
Endicott gazed round at the excited countenances of the people, now full of his own spirit, and then turned suddenly to the standard-bearer, who stood close behind him.
Little as I understood of the language, yet from his animated gestures and the varying expression of his features--reflected as from so many mirrors in the countenances around him, I could easily discover the nature of those passions which he sought to arouse.
And said Sancho, "If by chance these gentlemen should want to know who was the hero that served them so, your worship may tell them that he is the famous Don Quixote of La Mancha, otherwise called the Knight of the Rueful Countenance.
Soon, however, I descended to details, and regarded with minute interest the innumerable varieties of figure, dress, air, gait, visage, and expression of countenance.
Mr Venus involuntarily smoothed his countenance, and looked at his hand, as if to see whether any of its speaking properties came off.
A game-cock in the stableyard, deprived of every spark of his accustomed animation, balanced himself dismally on one leg in a corner; a donkey, moping with drooping head under the narrow roof of an outhouse, appeared from his meditative and miserable countenance to be contemplating suicide.
It is true that in government, it is good to use men of one rank equally: for to countenance some extraordinarily, is to make them insolent, and the rest discontent; because they may claim a due.
Nor can the judicious reader be at a greater loss on account of Mrs Bridget Blifil, who, he may be assured, conducted herself through the whole season in which grief is to make its appearance on the outside of the body, with the strictest regard to all the rules of custom and decency, suiting the alterations of her countenance to the several alterations of her habit: for as this changed from weeds to black, from black to grey, from grey to white, so did her countenance change from dismal to sorrowful, from sorrowful to sad, and from sad to serious, till the day came in which she was allowed to return to her former serenity.
Osgood was adorned with the speaking countenance of Miss Henly.