counterargue


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counterargue

(ˈkaʊntərˌɑːɡjuː)
vb
to argue against something
References in periodicals archive ?
Receivers who are confronted with health-threatening cancer messages may want to counterargue the message, as they wish to "maintain an illusion of invulnerability" (Kreuter et al.
13, 13 (2001) ("[P]ersuasion is largely the result of peripheral processing and distraction from somewhat unpleasant messages when receivers are expected to counterargue the message or be resistant to change.
One might counterargue that what is moral may not be legal.
If you could think clearly, regarding your statement that Italians wouldn't know how to translate the American term "school shootings," you'd counterargue that Americans would have a difficult time translating the European term "Islamic shootings.
That is, individuals will seek out confirming arguments and counterargue incongruent information, which results in a reinforcement of prior attitudes.
One could counterargue that in the absence of testing for the most common diarrheagenic pathogen in the United States (norovirus), that diarrhea in at least some of these C.
Transformation skeptics, such as the Brooking Institution's Michael O'Hanlon, counterargue that the US military is already innovating at an acceptable rate-in what O'Hanlon terms a process of "ambitious incrementalism"--and simply does not need to radically accelerate the pace of technological advance.
Others counterargue that homework provides the resources and incentives that struggling and/or low-wealth students need to do academic work outside school.
Pakistan would "have the most to lose from a Taliban victory in Kabul," they counterargue, "because it would inevitably strengthen the Taliban in Pakistan.
It is possible to counterargue that there were no alternative superior uses under autarkic planned chaos without nullifying Shlykov's larger point.
Sobolev resembles Wimsatt, however, by wanting definitively to counterargue earlier Hopkins critics.
Deaf activists counterargue by insisting that it is attitudes and the environment, not Deafness itself, which are disabling, and therefore they have every right to use such funds in efforts to change a disabling environment so it better accommodates Deafness.