counterevidence


Also found in: Legal.

counterevidence

(ˌkaʊntərˈɛvɪdəns)
n
evidence that refutes other evidence

coun•ter•ev•i•dence

(ˈkaʊn tərˌɛv ɪ dəns)
n.
evidence that tends to refute other evidence.
[1660–70]
References in periodicals archive ?
Liberated Blacks such as Frederick Douglass provided a powerful form of counterevidence.
We also saw teachers think about the importance of considering counterevidence, such as when Mr.
Still, for a historian, the series of mutual accusations and counterevidence in the form of opposing testimony that compose a typical Muscovite trial record hardly represent a better instrument for discovering who was telling the truth than the laconic formulae of divorce contracts.
After providing our brothers in Lebanon with the details of the verdict, the relation of Hezbollah with this cell and the kind of help provided by members of Hezbollah to it, we expect them to submit counterevidence and to check our evidence.
If the researchers need counterevidence, just look at the impact of the many businesses located in city regions that do engage, do connect and do bring out the culture, commitment and character of its people.
O'Rourke's informative book All the Trouble in the World, which gave convincing counterevidence to all of the doomsday scenarios of the time.
The textual examples in the previous section provide counterevidence to the interpretation that Woolf presents consciousness as isolated and impenetrable.
Occasionally, however, the author's theoretical proclivity allows important counterevidence to be ignored.
Counterevidence or alternative but equally consistent proposals are seldom discussed, and the basic properties of formal axiomatic systems (particularly, consistency and incompleteness, both intimately related to overgeneration15) are most frequently overlooked.
As a research team, we met weekly and weighed evidence and counterevidence for each dyad.
Delusions are resistant to counterevidence and impervious to counterargument.
Overarching the critical counterevidence against this initial reading, there are at least two broader senses in which the reading might be said to have been, as it were, too "good" to be true.