counterimage

counterimage

(ˈkaʊntərˌɪmɪdʒ)
n
a corresponding image
References in periodicals archive ?
Yet by at least the mid-nineteenth century, a counterimage of the heart as "a space associated with the self, with emotion, with feeling, and with the soul" was firmly in place, and remains pervasive today.
Online media have also enabled middle-class users to participate in global debates to challenge pervasive stereotypes about India and what they see as Western bias in portraying countries like India as backward Third World countries and to offer the counterimage of a rising global power.
But it is the female warrior in particular who offers a powerful counterimage to that of the raped and dishonored victim who is considered a source of shame to her family and community.
Specifically, in the 1990s, Quebecois nationalism served as a counterimage ("them") facilitating the conditional inclusion of ethnically diverse immigrants ("others") into a multicultural Canadian "we" (Winter 2001).
The counterimage she refers to is more than contesting stereotypical images of the "savage"; it represents their political and ideological power as they find a place in modernity (through modern labor and wages, which fed back into their potlatch system), rather than rejecting it.
Richard Sennett, The Fall of Public Man (New York: Vintage, 1976); Herbert Marcuse, 'The Affirmative Character of Culture" in Negations: Essays in Critical Theory, translated by Jeremy J Shapiro (Boston: Beacon Press, 1968) 88 at 98 (arguing that the concept of the person in bourgeois culture is an idealist disregard of social conflicts and conventions, and charging classical literature since Shakespeare with affirming the ideal, producing in its representations of individual interaction the counterimage of what occurs in social reality).
The global community is partly created in the counterimage of the atrocities it seeks to fight: Interconnected, caring people discover their own humanity in response to the inhumane nature of Kony and his Lord's Resistance Army-and also in response to the suffering of victims such as Jacob.
But the poison turns this sacred ideality of blood into a foul and unnatural counterimage, ruining the smoothness of sovereign sanguinity.
Beyond this Orientalist tradition, the woman acrobat/traveler provides a totally subversive counterimage of flexibility, liberation, and autonomy.
It allows, for instance, the viewer to conceive of the abstract space of Katharina Grosse not just as another version of "painting in the expanded field" but also as a constructive counterimage, a nonplace that compels us to imagine otherwise.
man is always in communion with his counterimage, woman, and yet never reaches her.