counterreaction

Related to counterreaction: phenakism

counterreaction

(ˈkaʊntərɪˌækʃən)
n
a reaction against an initial action
Translations

counterreaction

n. reacción opuesta; reacción en contra de.
References in periodicals archive ?
The counterreaction came Monday, as Iraqi troops, backed by Shiite militias, took control of a key military base and oil fields in the region around Kirkuk, an area controlled by the Kurdish peshmerga militias but claimed by Baghdad.
Thus, Democrats' 21-point increase since 2003 in belief in the media's accuracy may be a recent counterreaction to Trump's criticism of mainstream media, reflecting a renewed appreciation for the press.
Perhaps it was as a counterreaction to this growing
Part I explains the transition from Berle and Means's trust paradigm, to the rise of contractarianism, to the eventual counterreaction against contractarianism.
The counterreaction to the perceived failures of Woodrow Wilson's liberal internationalism precipitated a reappraisal of the term in London during the 1920s and 1930s, with it coming to be seen more positively as a steady adjustment to facts, as opposed to Wilson's starry-eyed idealism.
115) But he could not simply fire half of his Politburo colleagues without risking a dangerous political counterreaction.
Provider loss aversion also implies that penalties for underperformance should not be so large as to trigger a counterreaction among providers seeking to replace lost income by inducing additional demand for fee-based services or skimping on necessary, but difficult-to-measure services.
When the adversary displays an unexpected reaction, increased investment in previous choices would further entrench an obsolete action while foregoing a more appropriate counterreaction.
Accusing the government of giving a knee- jerk reaction to the students' protests, O'Brien said: " That reaction has a counterreaction.
The outbreak of the 1973 War precipitated a counterreaction with 15 African American congressmen cosponsoring a resolution urging US military resupply of Israel, and 75 black labor leaders calling on African Americans to "stand with Israel in its struggle to live and be free.
Just as Falwell's career was, in part, a reaction to liberal clerics before him, there has been a counterreaction to conservative evangelical politics, although it was a long time coming.
Ever since the feminist heyday of the 1970s, our culture has seen the whittling away of traditional male power, especially the power of white men, a process that, with almost Newtonian certainty, has produced a counterreaction in the culture wars--be it the fight over abortion (which is about women controlling their own bodies) or gay marriage (which is shot through with panic that familiar ideas of maleness are being replaced by unsettling new ones).