counterreformer

counterreformer

(ˌkaʊntərɪˈfɔːmə)
n
a reformer who acts in opposition to another reform
References in periodicals archive ?
Henry Thode, for example, turns Michelangelo's incontentabilita into a dissatisfaction born of the incompatibility between pagan form and the mystical, Christian substance of his work -- an unconvincing thesis, in my opinion, in that it would make the artist an overt counterreformer, which, I maintain, he was not.
2) The noted counterreformer Francesco Bocchi concurred with the interpretation of "divine" as applied to the "perfect" Michelangelo.
From the moment Ariosto referred to him as "Michel piu che mortal Angel divino" (Michael, more than a mortal, Angel divine),(1) the supernaturally inspired artist was claimed by the counterreformers.
In Europe, Christianity had permeated all sectors of public life by the end of the sixteenth century, to the extent that the reformers and counterreformers managed to mobilize the populace towards the denominational orientations which have characterized European Christianity until today.
The author surveys the impact of these motivations on the content of economic reforms, outlines the strategies of counterreformers and predicts the future of reforms in Soviet-type economies.
Although the counterreformers are very effective in adjusting their obstructive actions to different circumstances, they probably cannot always implement their first-best (i.
Ironically, counterreformers use the adverse results arising from their interference as evidence of the failure of the reforms themselves during the next campaign for reversal,