countertransference


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coun·ter·trans·fer·ence

 (koun′tər-trăns-fûr′əns, -trăns′fər-)
n.
Psychological transference by a psychotherapist in reaction to the emotions, experiences, or problems of a patient undergoing treatment.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.countertransference - the psychoanalyst's displacement of emotion onto the patient or more generally the psychoanalyst's emotional involvement in the therapeutic interaction
transference - (psychoanalysis) the process whereby emotions are passed on or displaced from one person to another; during psychoanalysis the displacement of feelings toward others (usually the parents) is onto the analyst
Translations

countertransference

n (psych) contratransferencia
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References in periodicals archive ?
In areas such as considering professional ethics and countertransference in relation to religious and spiritual issues, and implementing religious or spiritual interventions in psychotherapy (Aten, McMinn, & Worthington, 2011), the differences between explicitly Christian programs and other APA-accredited programs are striking.
Similarly, some counselors and psychotherapists might like to bury the whole idea of countertransference, putting it out of sight, out of mind.
Engage in reflective, mindful practice and attend to cultural countertransference to provide insight into one's own values, beliefs, and behaviors.
One problem, she says is that schools no longer are teaching about transference and countertransference, the phenomena in which a patient views the therapist as representing someone important in his/her life (such as a mother or husband) and the therapist in turn projects some feelings onto the patient.
The book explores the conceptual underpinnings of Integrity Therapy and Mowrer's unique treatment approach, detailing his methods for setting conditions for therapy, assessing clinical data, rules of engagement for transference and countertransference, and handling client resistance.
He considers different levels of communication, including sensing and interpreting signs, speaking and listening, thinking, feeling, behaving, storytelling (including narrative therapy), hypnosis, body language, transference and countertransference, acting and roles, dealing with difficult situations, play, ritual, motivation, and decision making, with activities related to each.
Since the book is aimed at those already practising in the field, it succinctly acknowledges and addresses some of the main issues, for example, countertransference and other presenting ethical considerations.
The clinician may experience a negative countertransference and act on negative feelings by discounting or not listening to the patient, hastily drawing the consultation to a close.
This transferential relation, however, may also initiate a countertransference on the part of the teacher--the "feelings, phantasies, anxieties, defenses, and wishes made from what teaching feels like" (Britzman, 2009, p.
As an example, treatment chapters include nuanced and thought-provoking consideration of the advantages (understanding and empathy) and potential pitfalls (overidentification and other countertransference risks) of LGBT clinicians treating LGBT clients as well as discussion of the blind spots and biases that can interfere with straight clinicians' ability to effectively treat these individuals.
I usually counsel people that if you have countertransference that is similar in nature and occurs three times in a row, then you need to go to therapy and figure out what the root of it is," O'Mara says.