counting


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count 1

 (kount)
v. count·ed, count·ing, counts
v.tr.
1.
a. To name or list (the units of a group or collection) one by one in order to determine a total; number.
b. To recite numerals in ascending order up to and including: count three before firing.
c. To include in a reckoning; take account of: ten dogs, counting the puppies.
2. Informal
a. To include by or as if by counting: Count me in.
b. To exclude by or as if by counting: Count me out.
3. To believe or consider to be; deem: Count yourself lucky.
v.intr.
1. To recite or list numbers in order or enumerate items by units or groups: counted by tens.
2.
a. To have importance: You really count with me.
b. To have a specified importance or value: Their opinions count for little. Each basket counts for two points.
3. Music To keep time by counting beats.
n.
1. The act of counting or calculating.
2.
a. A number reached by counting.
b. The totality of specific items in a particular sample: a white blood cell count.
3. Law Any of the separate and distinct charges or causes of action in an indictment or complaint.
4. Sports The counting from one to ten seconds, during which time a boxer who has been knocked down must rise or be declared the loser.
5. Baseball The number of balls and strikes that an umpire has called against a batter.
Phrasal Verbs:
count down
To recite numerals in descending order, as during a countdown.
count off
To recite numbers in turn, as when dividing people or things into groups : The 24 children counted off by twos, forming a dozen pairs.
count on
1. To rely on; depend on: You can count on my help.
2. To be confident of; anticipate: counted on getting a raise.
count out
To declare (a boxer) to have been knocked out by calling out the count.
Idiom:
count heads/noses
To make a count of members, attendees, or participants.

[Middle English counten, from Old French conter, from Latin computāre, to calculate : com-, com- + putāre, to think; see pau- in Indo-European roots.]

count 2

 (kount)
n.
1. A nobleman in some European countries.
2. Used as a title for such a nobleman.

[Middle English counte, from Old French conte, from Late Latin comes, comit-, occupant of any state office, from Latin, companion; see ei- in Indo-European roots.]

counting

(ˈkaʊntɪŋ)
n
1. the saying of numbers
2. totalling up; adding
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.counting - the act of countingcounting - the act of counting; reciting numbers in ascending order; "the counting continued for several hours"
investigating, investigation - the work of inquiring into something thoroughly and systematically
blood count - the act of estimating the number of red and white corpuscles in a blood sample
census, nose count, nosecount - a periodic count of the population
countdown - counting backward from an arbitrary number to indicate the time remaining before some event (such as launching a space vehicle)
miscount - an inaccurate count
poll - the counting of votes (as in an election)
recount - an additional (usually a second) count; especially of the votes in a close election
sperm count - the act of estimating the number of spermatozoa in an ejaculate

counting

noun
Related words
like arithmomania
Translations

counting

[ˈkaʊntɪŋ] Ncálculo m
References in classic literature ?
Nearly seventy, I believe," answered Meg, counting stitches to hide the merriment in her eyes.
I was counting on keeping chickens, and maybe a cow.
The lady in black was counting her beads for the third time.
I recollect counting over perfectly the possibilities, reminding myself that nothing was more natural, for instance, then the appearance of one of the men about the place, or even of a messenger, a postman, or a tradesman's boy, from the village.
But being now interrupted, he put up the image; and pretty soon, going to the table, took up a large book there, and placing it on his lap began counting the pages with deliberate regularity; at every fiftieth page --as I fancied --stopping a moment, looking vacantly around him, and giving utterance to a long-drawn gurgling whistle of astonishment.
You know how quick some of the gentry are to suspect us of cheating and overcharging; why, they stand with their purses in their hands counting it over to a penny and looking at us as if we were pickpockets.
The sound of them here was as of all the barnyards of the universe; and as for counting them--it would have taken all day simply to count the pens.
Shelby was busy in counting some bundles of bills, which, as they were counted, he pushed over to the trader, who counted them likewise.
To appreciate the full magnitude of this stroke, consider these other figures: the annual expenses of a national government amount to the equivalent of a contribution of three days' average wages of every individual of the population, counting every individual as if he were a man.
Without intending it--hardly knowing it--I fell to listening intently to that sound, and even unconsciously counting the strokes of the mouse's nutmeg-grater.
When he had ciphered it out he told me how we was to do; then we went and waited around the spoon-basket till we see Aunt Sally coming, and then Tom went to counting the spoons and laying them out to one side, and I slid one of them up my sleeve, and Tom says:
Numbers and sizes and distances are so great, here, that we have to be made so we can FEEL them - our old ways of counting and measuring and ciphering wouldn't ever give us an idea of them, but would only confuse us and oppress us and make our heads ache.