country-dance


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coun·try-dance

(kŭn′trē-dăns′)
n.
A folk dance of English origin in which two lines of dancers face each other.

coun′try-dance`



n.
a dance of rural English origin, esp. one in which the dancers face each other in two rows.
[1570–80]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.country-dance - a type of folk dance in which couples are arranged in sets or face one another in a linecountry-dance - a type of folk dance in which couples are arranged in sets or face one another in a line
folk dance, folk dancing - a style of dancing that originated among ordinary people (not in the royal courts)
longways, longways dance - country dancing performed with couples in two long lines facing each other
square dance, square dancing - American country dancing in which couples form squares
do-si-do - a square-dance figure; two dancers approach each other and circle back to back before returning to their original places
promenade - a square dance figure; couples march counterclockwise in a circle
sashay - a square dance figure; partners circle each other taking sideways steps
swing - a square dance figure; a pair of dancers join hands and dance around a point between them
landler - a moderately slow Austrian country dance in triple time; involves spinning and clapping
Verb1.country-dance - perform a contradance
trip the light fantastic, trip the light fantastic toe, dance - move in a pattern; usually to musical accompaniment; do or perform a dance; "My husband and I like to dance at home to the radio"
References in classic literature ?
As for Godfrey, he was feeling so happy and oblivious under the long charm of the country-dance with Nancy, that he got rather bold on the strength of her confusion, and was capable of leading her straight away, without leave asked, into the adjoining small parlour, where the card-tables were set.
Craig, and Mary Burge by Adam; and now the music struck up, and the glorious country-dance, best of all dances, began.
He hurried away to seek another matronly partner, for due honour must be paid to the married women before he asked any of the young ones; and the country-dances, and the stamping, and the gracious nodding, and the waving of the hands, went on joyously.
Crawford's very cordial adieus, pass quietly away; stopping at the entrance-door, like the Lady of Branxholm Hall, "one moment and no more," to view the happy scene, and take a last look at the five or six determined couple who were still hard at work; and then, creeping slowly up the principal staircase, pursued by the ceaseless country-dance, feverish with hopes and fears, soup and negus, sore-footed and fatigued, restless and agitated, yet feeling, in spite of everything, that a ball was indeed delightful.
All through the deplorable cause, everything that everybody in it, except one man, knows already is referred to that only one man who don't know it to find out--all through the deplorable cause, everybody must have copies, over and over again, of everything that has accumulated about it in the way of cartloads of papers (or must pay for them without having them, which is the usual course, for nobody wants them) and must go down the middle and up again through such an infernal country-dance of costs and fees and nonsense and corruption as was never dreamed of in the wildest visions of a witch's Sabbath.
I consider a country-dance as an emblem of marriage.
At times, indeed, whether from art or nature I will not determine, he gave his usual loose to gaiety and mirth; but this was always in general company, and with other women; for even in a country-dance, when he was not my partner, he became grave, and put on the softest look imaginable the moment he approached me.
In five minutes the eleven and half a dozen of the Wellesburn and Marylebone men got partners somehow or another, and a merry country-dance was going on, to which every one flocked, and new couples joined in every minute, till there were a hundred of them going down the middle and up again; and the long line of school buildings looked gravely down on them, every window glowing with the last rays of the western sun; and the rooks clanged about in the tops of the old elms, greatly excited, and resolved on having their country- dance too; and the great flag flapped lazily in the gentle western breeze.
The fiddle and the flageolet took a deep interest in bottles and glasses; at the end of a country-dance, they hung their instruments from a button on their reddish-colored coats, and stretched out their hands to a little table set in the window recess to hold their liquor supply.
But as to dancing, they could hardly help my learning country-dances, because they always wanted me to make up even number; and, on the other hand, they were as heartily willing to learn me everything that they had been taught themselves, as I could be to take the learning.
Joe Willet rode leisurely along in his desponding mood, picturing the locksmith's daughter going down long country-dances, and poussetting dreadfully with bold strangers--which was almost too much to bear--when he heard the tramp of a horse's feet behind him, and looking back, saw a well-mounted gentleman advancing at a smart canter.