coupled


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Related to coupled: Coupled reaction, Coupled circuits, coupled oscillators, tightly coupled

cou·ple

 (kŭp′əl)
n.
1. Two items of the same kind; a pair.
2. Something that joins or connects two things together; a link.
3. (used with a sing. or pl. verb)
a. Two people united, as by betrothal or marriage.
b. Two people together.
4. Informal A few; several: a couple of days.
5. Physics A pair of forces of equal magnitude acting in parallel but opposite directions, capable of causing rotation but not translation.
v. cou·pled, cou·pling, cou·ples
v.tr.
1. To link together; connect: coupled her refusal with an explanation.
2. Electricity To link (two circuits or currents), as by magnetic induction.
3. Archaic To join together in marriage; marry.
v.intr.
1. To form pairs; join.
2. To unite sexually; have sexual intercourse.
3. To join chemically.
adj. Informal
Two or few: "Every couple years the urge strikes, to ... haul off to a new site" (Garrison Keillor).

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin cōpula, bond, pair.]
Usage Note: When used to refer to two people who function socially as a unit, as in a married couple, the word couple may take either a singular or a plural verb, depending on whether the members are considered individually or collectively: The couple were married last week. Only one couple was left on the dance floor. When a pronoun follows, they and their are more common than it and its: The couple decided to spend their (less commonly its) vacation in Florida. Using a singular verb and a plural pronoun, as in The couple wants their children to go to college, is widely considered to be incorrect. Care should be taken that the verb and pronoun agree in number: The couple want their children to go to college. · Although the phrase a couple of has been well established in English since before the Renaissance, modern critics have sometimes maintained that a couple of is too inexact to be appropriate in formal writing. But the inexactitude of a couple of may serve a useful purpose, suggesting that the writer is indifferent to the precise number of items involved. Thus the sentence She lives only a couple of miles away implies not only that the distance is short but that its exact measure is unimportant. This usage should be considered unobjectionable on all levels of style. · The of in the phrase a couple of is often dropped in speech, but this omission is usually considered a mistake. In 2013, 80 percent of the Usage Panel found the sentence A couple friends came over to watch the game to be unacceptable.

coupled

(ˈkʌpəld)
adj
being one of the partners in a permanent sexual relationship
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.coupled - joined together especially in a pair or pairs
united - characterized by unity; being or joined into a single entity; "presented a united front"
2.coupled - connected by a link, as railway cars or trailer trucks
connected - joined or linked together
Translations
References in classic literature ?
The fight concerned the publication of Clarence Richmond's name coupled with that of a woman school teacher, and as the dead man had begun the row by firing upon the editor, the effort to punish the slayer was unsuccessful.
He approached this highly artificial instrument through a mere instinct, and coupled himself to it, as if he knew it was to piece him out and make a whole creature of him.
This circumstance, coupled with his ambiguous, half-hinting, half-revealing, shrouded sort of talk, now begat in me all kinds of vague wonderments and half-apprehensions, and all connected with the Pequod; and Captain Ahab; and the leg he had lost; and the Cape Horn fit; and the silver calabash; and what Captain Peleg had said of him, when I left the ship the day previous; and the prediction of the squaw Tistig; and the voyage we had bound ourselves to sail; and a hundred other shadowy things.
These two had been boys together in Virginia when that state still ranked as the chief and most imposing member of the Union, and they still coupled the proud and affectionate adjective "old" with her name when they spoke of her.
The punishment was bad enough, but to be coupled in correction with Seesaw Simpson was beyond human endurance.