Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to courses: Online courses


a. Development in a particular way; progress: the course of events.
b. Movement in time; duration: in the course of a year.
a. The direction of continuing movement: The boat took a northern course.
b. The route or path taken by something that moves, such as a stream or vehicle.
3. Sports
a. A designated route or area on which a race is held: the course of a marathon.
4. A mode of action or behavior: followed the best course and invested her money.
5. A typical, natural, or customary manner of proceeding or developing: a fad that ran its course.
6. A systematic or orderly succession; a sequence: a course of medical treatments.
7. A continuous layer of building material, such as brick or tile, on a wall or roof of a building.
a. A complete body of prescribed studies constituting a curriculum: a four-year course in engineering.
b. A unit of such a curriculum: took an introductory course in chemistry; passed her calculus course.
9. A part of a meal served as a unit at one time: The first course was a delicious soup.
10. Nautical The lowest sail on a mast of a square-rigged ship.
11. A point on the compass, especially the one toward which a vehicle, such as a ship, is moving.
v. coursed, cours·ing, cours·es
1. To move swiftly through or over; traverse: ships coursing the seas.
a. To hunt (game) with hounds.
b. To set (hounds) to chase game.
1. To proceed or move swiftly in a certain direction or along a course: "Big tears now coursed down her face" (Iris Murdoch).
2. To hunt game with hounds.
off course
Away from the planned or intended course.
in due course
At the proper or right time: Things will get better in due course.
of course
1. As is to be expected under the circumstances; naturally or obviously: Of course someone had to clean up the mess.
2. Used to indicate assent or agreement: "Do you like her music?" "Of course!"
on course
Following the planned or intended course.
run/take its course
To follow its natural progression or development: Should we let the illness run its course?

[Middle English, from Old French cours, from Latin cursus, from past participle of currere, to run; see kers- in Indo-European roots.]


pl n
(Physiology) (sometimes singular) physiol another word for menses
References in classic literature ?
said the scout, shaking his head doubtingly; "When the sun is scorching the tree tops, and the water courses are full; when the moss on every beech he sees will tell him in what quarter the north star will shine at night.
Then seating himself before it, you would have seen him intently study the various lines and shadings which there met his eye; and with slow but steady pencil trace additional courses over spaces that before were blank.
Lying in strange folds, courses, and convolutions, to their apprehensions, it seems more in keeping with the idea of his general might to regard that mystic part of him as the seat of his intelligence.
Breakfast over, Aunt Polly had family worship: it began with a prayer built from the ground up of solid courses of Scriptural quotations, welded together with a thin mortar of originality; and from the summit of this she delivered a grim chapter of the Mosaic Law, as from Sinai.
Other stars in their courses governed Rebecca's doings.
They were called on to share in the awkwardness of a rather long interval between the courses, and obliged to be as formal and as orderly as the others; but when the table was again safely covered, when every corner dish was placed exactly right, and occupation and ease were generally restored, Emma said,
At present I incline toward the last of these three courses.
Lorry's veins, methodical as their courses could usually be, were in no better state now it was his turn.
Men's courses will foreshadow certain ends, to which, if persevered in, they must lead,' said Scrooge.
So the crooked courses will become crookeder, at any moment, for the least reason, or for none.
Raveloe was not a place where moral censure was severe, but it was thought a weakness in the Squire that he had kept all his sons at home in idleness; and though some licence was to be allowed to young men whose fathers could afford it, people shook their heads at the courses of the second son, Dunstan, commonly called Dunsey Cass, whose taste for swopping and betting might turn out to be a sowing of something worse than wild oats.
So I dined; and when the courses of my dining were ended, I found myself in a mellow twilight at the Cafe du Ciel.