courtesy card

cour′tesy card`


n.
a card making the bearer eligible for special prices or privileges, as at a hotel, club, or bank.
[1930–35, Amer.]
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References in periodicals archive ?
However, New Taipei City does not provide these services to their senior courtesy card holders.
Another draw for Discount Drug Mart is the once-a-month senior savings day, and the chain keeps expanding the capabilities of its courtesy card, on which it can now load cash awards and gift cards.
MANILA -- Here's a stern reminder to traffic enforcers, especially to those who flagged down a curvaceous model for a traffic violation but let her go after she showed a courtesy card of a police official: Spare no one when enforcing the law.
Tickets are $35, and include a courtesy card worth $5 off at each of the 11 restaurants.
Croissants, fresh fruit and freshlybrewed coffee keep the wolf from the door, while the thoughtful touch of a courtesy card with the weather and temperature marked on it meant there are no 'what shall I wear?
For a decade or more Jones had a courtesy card at CUA library, which was just that, a courtesy.
Shop Rite courtesy card records your sale amounts and when you spend $150 you get a free turkey and when you spend $300, you get 15% off your next order.
The invitation said Parks would be provided with a courtesy card allowing him to make golf or dining reservations and he would be billed monthly for any expenses.
Special with an end to end transaction management and consumer value-added solution, which will include an IBM 4690 point-of-service system, client/server based transaction switching, check management, a courtesy card program, and a pilot electronic check conversion program.
Police said if you want the sale price at Price Chopper, you have to show a courtesy card at the register, which Newton didn't do.
Ironically for a high-security technology the Sheriff's Office has been inspired to use the metallised holograms on its business and courtesy cards as well.
We keep telling ourselves we are doing a good job because our traditional means of measurement -- focus groups, courtesy cards or the occasional letter or phone call-tells us we are.