courtier

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court·i·er

 (kôr′tē-ər, -tyər)
n.
1. An attendant at a sovereign's court.
2. One who seeks favor, especially by insincere flattery or obsequious behavior.

[Middle English courteour, from Anglo-Norman, from Old French cortoier, to be at a royal court, from cort, court; see court.]

courtier

(ˈkɔːtɪə)
n
1. an attendant at a court
2. a person who seeks favour in an ingratiating manner
[C13: from Anglo-French courteour (unattested), from Old French corteier to attend at court]

cour•ti•er

(ˈkɔr ti ər, ˈkoʊr-)

n.
1. a person who is often in attendance at the court of a king or other royal personage.
2. a person who flatters.
[1250–1300; Middle English courteour < Anglo-French courte(i)our= Old French cortoy(er) to attend at court (derivative of court court) + Anglo-French -our < Latin -ōr- -or2]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.courtier - an attendant at the court of a sovereigncourtier - an attendant at the court of a sovereign
attendant, attender, tender - someone who waits on or tends to or attends to the needs of another

courtier

noun attendant, follower, squire, pursuivant (Historical), train-bearer, liegeman (Historical) a courtier who worked in the royal household
Quotations
"The two maxims of any great man at court are, always to keep his countenance, and never to keep his word" [Jonathan Swift Thoughts on Various Subjects]

courtier

noun
One who flatters another excessively:
Informal: apple-polisher.
Translations
مِن حاشِيَة المَلِك
dvořan
hofdamehofmand
udvari emberudvaronc
hirîmaîur
dvoran
saraylı

courtier

[ˈkɔːtɪəʳ] Ncortesano/a m/f

courtier

[ˈkɔːrtɪər] n (= man) → courtisan m (= woman) → dame f de (la) cour

courtier

nHöfling m

courtier

[ˈkɔːtɪəʳ] ncortigiano/a

court

(koːt) noun
1. a place where legal cases are heard. a magistrates' court; the High Court.
2. the judges and officials of a legal court. The accused is to appear before the court on Friday.
3. a marked-out space for certain games. a tennis-court; a squash court.
4. the officials, councillors etc of a king or queen. the court of King James.
5. the palace of a king or queen. Hampton Court.
6. an open space surrounded by houses or by the parts of one house.
verb
1. to try to win the love of; to woo.
2. to try to gain (admiration etc).
3. to seem to be deliberately risking (disaster etc).
ˈcourtier (-tiə) noun
a member of the court of a king or queen. He was one of King James' courtiers.
ˈcourtly adjective
having fine manners.
ˈcourtliness noun
ˈcourtship noun
courting or wooing.
ˈcourthouse noun
a building where legal cases are held.
ˌcourt-ˈmartialplural ˌcourts-ˈmartial noun
a court held by officers of the armed forces to try offences against discipline.
ˈcourtyard noun
a court or enclosed ground beside, or surrounded by, a building. the courtyard of the castle.
References in classic literature ?
He introduced himself, smiling a smirky smile borrowed from the courtiers of the stage, extended a fair-skinned talon, and while he gripped my hand in it he bent his body forward three times at the hips, as the stage courtier does, and said in the airiest and most condescending and patronizing way--I quite remember his exact language:
While, with smooth and smiling cheek, the courtiers, each in turn, followed their Prince's example, and aimed a shaft of ridicule at Cedric, the face of the Saxon became inflamed with passion, and he glanced his eyes fiercely from one to another, as if the quick succession of so many injuries had prevented his replying to them in turn; or, like a baited bull, who, surrounded by his tormentors, is at a loss to choose from among them the immediate object of his revenge.
The ladies and courtiers were all most magnificently clad; so that the spot they stood upon seemed to resemble a petticoat spread upon the ground, embroidered with figures of gold and silver.
said the Queen, pointing to the three gardeners who were lying round the rosetree; for, you see, as they were lying on their faces, and the pattern on their backs was the same as the rest of the pack, she could not tell whether they were gardeners, or soldiers, or courtiers, or three of her own children.
He struck it, and then it was hit back by the courtiers who were playing with him.
A king was once hunting in a great wood, and he hunted the game so eagerly that none of his courtiers could follow him.
The ceremony made use of at the reception of a stranger is somewhat unusual; as soon as he enters, all the courtiers strike him with their cudgels till he goes back to the door; the amity then subsisting between us did not secure me from this uncouth reception, which they told me, upon my demanding the reason of it, was to show those whom they treated with that they were the bravest people in the world, and that all other nations ought to bow down before them.
Accompanied by his wife, the Empress Theresa, and by a bevy of courtiers, the Emperor of Brazil, Dom Pedro de Alcantara, walked into the room, advanced with both hands outstretched to the bewildered Bell, and exclaimed: "Professor Bell, I am delighted to see you again.
To which Don Quixote replied, "The pursuit of my calling does not allow or permit me to go in any other fashion; easy life, enjoyment, and repose were invented for soft courtiers, but toil, unrest, and arms were invented and made for those alone whom the world calls knights-errant, of whom I, though unworthy, am the least of all.
Twas a lordly sight, I ween, this shifting of proud courtiers, flashing of jeweled fans, and commingling of bright colors with costly gems!
Is not Medoro the mythic form for all courtiers of feminine royalty, and Orlando the myth of disorderly, furious, and impotent revolutions, which destroy but cannot produce?
For once, and perhaps for the only time in my life, I used tact, and knew in what the special skill of courtiers and men of the world consists.