cousin


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Related to cousin: second cousin, Cousin marriage

cous·in

 (kŭz′ĭn)
n.
1. A child of one's aunt or uncle. Also called first cousin.
2. A relative descended from a common ancestor, such as a grandparent, by two or more steps in a diverging line.
3. A relative by blood or marriage; a kinsman or kinswoman.
4. A member of a kindred group or country: our Canadian cousins.
5. Something similar in quality or character: "There's no mistaking soca for its distant Jamaican cousin, reggae" (Michael Saunders).
6. Used as a form of address by a sovereign in addressing another sovereign or a high-ranking member of the nobility.

[Middle English cosin, a relative, from Old French, from Latin cōnsōbrīnus, cousin : com-, com- + sōbrīnus, cousin on the mother's side; see swesor- in Indo-European roots.]

cous′in·hood′ n.
cous′in·ly adj.
cous′in·ship′ n.

cousin

(ˈkʌzən)
n
1. Also called: first cousin, cousin-german or full cousin the child of one's aunt or uncle
2. a relative who has descended from one of one's common ancestors. A person's second cousin is the child of one of his parents' first cousins. A person's third cousin is the child of one of his parents' second cousins. A first cousin once removed (or loosely second cousin) is the child of one's first cousin
3. a member of a group related by race, ancestry, interests, etc: our Australian cousins.
4. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a title used by a sovereign when addressing another sovereign or a nobleman
[C13: from Old French cosin, from Latin consōbrīnus cousin, from sōbrīnus cousin on the mother's side; related to soror sister]
ˈcousinˌhood, ˈcousinˌship n
ˈcousinly adj, adv

Cousin

(French kuzɛ̃)
n
(Biography) Victor (viktɔr). 1792–1867, French philosopher and educational reformer

cous•in

(ˈkʌz ən)

n.
1. the son or daughter of an uncle or aunt.
2. one related by descent in a diverging line from a known common ancestor.
3. a kinsman or kinswoman; relative.
4. a person or thing related to another by similar natures, languages, geographical proximity, etc.
5. a term of address used by a sovereign for another sovereign or a high-ranking noble.
[1250–1300; Middle English cosin < Anglo-French co(u)sin, Old French cosin < Latin consōbrīnus cousin (properly, son of one's mother's sister) =con- con- + sōbrīnus second cousin (presumably orig. “pertaining to the sister”) <*swesrīnos=*swesr-, gradational variant of *swesōr (>soror sister) + *-īnos -ine1]
cous′in•ly, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cousin - the child of your aunt or uncle
relative, relation - a person related by blood or marriage; "police are searching for relatives of the deceased"; "he has distant relations back in New Jersey"
Translations
إبْن أو بِنت العم أو العمّـهاِبْنُ العَمِّ
bratranecsestřenice
kusinefætter
kuzo
serkkusukulainenpikkuserkku
bratić
unokatestvér
frændi eîa frænka
いとこ
사촌
antros eilės pusbrolisantros eilės pusseserėpusbrolispusseserė
brālēnsmāsīca
bratranecsesternica
bratranecsestrična
kusin
ลูกพี่ลูกน้อง
kuzenerkek yeğen
anh em họ

cousin

[ˈkʌzn] Nprimo/a m/f
first cousinprimo/a m/f carnal
second cousinprimo/a m/f segundo/a

cousin

[ˈkʌzən] ncousin(e) m/f first cousin, second cousin

cousin

n (male) → Cousin m, → Vetter m (dated); (female) → Cousine f, → Kusine f, → Base f (old); Kevin and Susan are cousinsKevin und Susan sind Cousin und Cousine

cousin

[ˈkʌzn] ncugino/a

cousin

(ˈkazn) noun
a son or daughter of one's uncle or aunt.
first/full cousin
a son or daughter of one's uncle or aunt.
second cousin
a child of one's parent's first cousin or a child of one's first cousin.

cousin

اِبْنُ العَمِّ bratranec kusine Cousin ξάδελφος primo serkku cousin bratić cugino いとこ 사촌 neef fetter kuzyn primo двоюродный брат kusin ลูกพี่ลูกน้อง kuzen anh em họ 堂表兄弟姊妹

cousin

n. primo-a.

cousin

n primo -ma mf
References in classic literature ?
Her cousin wired, asking her to advance the date, and this Mary did.
It was said she had been brutally jilted by her cousin, Rutland Whitney, and that she married this unknown man from the West out of bravado.
Some He placed among the snows, with their cousin, the bear.
When I get really well, John says we will ask Cousin Henry and Julia down for a long visit; but he says he would as soon put fireworks in my pillow-case as to let me have those stimulating people about now.
This was a nephew, the cousin of the miserable young man who had been convicted of the uncle's murder.
The landlord of the Spouter-Inn had recommended us to his cousin Hosea Hussey of the Try Pots, whom he asserted to be the proprietor of one of the best kept hotels in all Nantucket, and moreover he had assured us that cousin Hosea, as he called him, was famous for his chowders.
My dear cousin," said Lady Anne, laughing, "pray do not trouble your good careful head about me.
She stood in the doorway, shepherded by Cousin Marija, breathless from pushing through the crowd, and in her happiness painful to look upon.
He had taken her with him on a tour to Vermont, and had persuaded his cousin, Miss Ophelia St.
Bout three months ago my cousin Bud, fourteen year old, was riding through the woods on t'other side of the river, and didn't have no weapon with him, which was blame' foolishness, and in a lonesome place he hears a horse a-coming behind him, and sees old Baldy Shepherdson a-linkin' after him with his gun in his hand and his white hair a-flying in the wind; and 'stead of jumping off and taking to the brush, Bud 'lowed he could out- run him; so they had it, nip and tuck, for five mile or more, the old man a-gaining all the time; so at last Bud seen it warn't any use, so he stopped and faced around so as to have the bullet holes in front, you know, and the old man he rode up and shot him down.
And such a luxury to him was this petting of his sorrows, that he could not bear to have any worldly cheeriness or any grating delight intrude upon it; it was too sacred for such contact; and so, presently, when his cousin Mary danced in, all alive with the joy of seeing home again after an age-long visit of one week to the country, he got up and moved in clouds and darkness out at one door as she brought song and sunshine in at the other.
Only two hours," she sighed "That will be half past one; mother will be at cousin Ann's, the children at home will have had their dinner, and Hannah cleared all away.