couturière

(redirected from couturiere)
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Related to couturiere: couturière, couturiers

cou·tu·rière

 (ko͞o-to͝or′ē-ər, -ē-âr′, -tür-yĕr′)
n.
A woman who designs for or owns an establishment engaged in couture.

[French, dressmaker, seamstress, from Old French cousturiere, feminine of cousturier; see couturier.]

cou•tu•ri•ère

or cou•tu•ri•ere

(kuˈtʊər i ər, -iˌɛr)

n.
a woman who is a couturier.
[1810–20; < French]
References in classic literature ?
This, which would have defeated a bargain with any common couturiere, succeeded perfectly with Adrienne.
marchande de mode = milliner; rusee = crafty; couturiere = seamstress}
FOXTROTT - A TALLER US FOXTROTT is the nom de plume of Montreal beat couturiere and mix merchant Marie-Helene l Delorme, an artist raised on hip-hop, but with a taste for catchy pop and an instinct to deconstruct its base form.
FOXTROTT - A TALLER US Foxtrott is the nom de plume of Montreal beat couturiere and mix merchant Marie-Helene Delorme, an artist raised on hip-hop, but with a taste for catchy pop and an instinct to deconstruct its base form.
Outstanding effort winner was Sharon Reynolds, 12, and the overall silver trophy went to 13-year-old Vanessa Couturiere.
Pere dessinateur et photographe et mere dessinatrice aussi et couturiere.
Couturiere San' Ayoub said that the only way activists could change this mentality was to convince the Lebanese population that green fashion is in vogue.
By the end of the war, her designs were known throughout France, the high quality design, construction and finish of the clothes had established the reputation of Coco Chanel as a meticulous couturiere.
In William Faulkner's novel The Mansion, a couturiere of male neckties named Myra Allanovna makes her first and only appearance in his work within the book's art and genealogy leitmotifs (Dasher 361).
Les stars de tous les ans Yousra se presente cette annee avec un nouveau look dans [beaucoup moins que]Charbate Loz[beaucoup plus grand que] oE elle incarne le role d'une couturiere divorcee qui vit dans un quartier populaire et qui tente de faire face aux difficultes de la vie.
Crowston, who discusses the emergence of the eighteenth-century couturiere in France (3), it can be argued that Keckley emerged from the intersection of two distinct forces: first, from cultural conceptions of black femininity that cast needlework as an appropriate black female trade and encouraged black women to work for white clients of their own sex; second, from gendered and raced divisions of labor in America that accepted black women in this type of work.
His niece, Elsa Schiaparelli, became a famed couturiere and influenced many generations.